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What does Black Lives Matter REALLY stand for?

This group’s own website tells of a political set of views even CNN and leftist networks are probably afraid to touch.

For those who may be equivocating about Black Lives Matter and the Antifa riots and demonstrations, a very interesting point came to out attention today. Someone went and actually looked and read the BLM website to find out what they themselves say they are all about. My priest was told about this, and he told me, so I went and had a look, myself.

What follows is taken directly from this page: https://blacklivesmatter.com/what-we-believe/

It is important to actually inform the public about this group, taken from their own statements about themselves, and then make your own decisions as to whether or not this is a group you want to actually trust or support in any way. One thing is clear – this group is not about stopping racism. After their self-description will come some further comment.


Four years ago, what is now known as the Black Lives Matter Global Network began to organize. It started out as a chapter-based, member-led organization whose mission was to build local power and to intervene when violence was inflicted on Black communities by the state and vigilantes.

In the years since, we’ve committed to struggling together and to imagining and creating a world free of anti-Blackness, where every Black person has the social, economic, and political power to thrive.

Black Lives Matter began as a call to action in response to state-sanctioned violence and anti-Black racism. Our intention from the very beginning was to connect Black people from all over the world who have a shared desire for justice to act together in their communities. The impetus for that commitment was, and still is, the rampant and deliberate violence inflicted on us by the state.

Enraged by the death of Trayvon Martin and the subsequent acquittal of his killer, George Zimmerman, and inspired by the 31-day takeover of the Florida State Capitol by POWER U and the Dream Defenders, we took to the streets. A year later, we set out together on the Black Lives Matter Freedom Ride to Ferguson, in search of justice for Mike Brown and all of those who have been torn apart by state-sanctioned violence and anti-Black racism. Forever changed, we returned home and began building the infrastructure for the Black Lives Matter Global Network, which, even in its infancy, has become a political home for many.

Ferguson helped to catalyze a movement to which we’ve all helped give life. Organizers who call this network home have ousted anti-Black politicians, won critical legislation to benefit Black lives, and changed the terms of the debate on Blackness around the world. Through movement and relationship building, we have also helped catalyze other movements and shifted culture with an eye toward the dangerous impacts of anti-Blackness.

These are the results of our collective efforts.

The Black Lives Matter Global Network is as powerful as it is because of our membership, our partners, our supporters, our staff, and you. Our continued commitment to liberation for all Black people means we are continuing the work of our ancestors and fighting for our collective freedom because it is our duty.

Every day, we recommit to healing ourselves and each other, and to co-creating alongside comrades, allies, and family a culture where each person feels seen, heard, and supported.

We acknowledge, respect, and celebrate differences and commonalities.

We work vigorously for freedom and justice for Black people and, by extension, all people.

We intentionally build and nurture a beloved community that is bonded together through a beautiful struggle that is restorative, not depleting.

We are unapologetically Black in our positioning. In affirming that Black Lives Matter, we need not qualify our position. To love and desire freedom and justice for ourselves is a prerequisite for wanting the same for others.

We see ourselves as part of the global Black family, and we are aware of the different ways we are impacted or privileged as Black people who exist in different parts of the world.

We are guided by the fact that all Black lives matter, regardless of actual or perceived sexual identity, gender identity, gender expression, economic status, ability, disability, religious beliefs or disbeliefs, immigration status, or location.

We make space for transgender brothers and sisters to participate and lead.

We are self-reflexive and do the work required to dismantle cisgender privilege and uplift Black trans folk, especially Black trans women who continue to be disproportionately impacted by trans-antagonistic violence.

We build a space that affirms Black women and is free from sexism, misogyny, and environments in which men are centered.

We practice empathy. We engage comrades with the intent to learn about and connect with their contexts.

We make our spaces family-friendly and enable parents to fully participate with their children. We dismantle the patriarchal practice that requires mothers to work “double shifts” so that they can mother in private even as they participate in public justice work.

We disrupt the Western-prescribed nuclear family structure requirement by supporting each other as extended families and “villages” that collectively care for one another, especially our children, to the degree that mothers, parents, and children are comfortable.

We foster a queer‐affirming network. When we gather, we do so with the intention of freeing ourselves from the tight grip of heteronormative thinking, or rather, the belief that all in the world are heterosexual (unless s/he or they disclose otherwise).

We cultivate an intergenerational and communal network free from ageism. We believe that all people, regardless of age, show up with the capacity to lead and learn.

We embody and practice justice, liberation, and peace in our engagements with one another.


While the movement is actually very well portrayed here (good prose), the actual points of view are not about ending racism. They are about throwing off the morals and boundaries defined by a Christian civilization.

This is directly stated here:

We make our spaces family-friendly and enable parents to fully participate with their children. We dismantle the patriarchal practice that requires mothers to work “double shifts” so that they can mother in private even as they participate in public justice work.

We disrupt the Western-prescribed nuclear family structure requirement by supporting each other as extended families and “villages” that collectively care for one another, especially our children, to the degree that mothers, parents, and children are comfortable.

We foster a queer‐affirming network. When we gather, we do so with the intention of freeing ourselves from the tight grip of heteronormative thinking, or rather, the belief that all in the world are heterosexual (unless s/he or they disclose otherwise).

What is amazing about this is that black Americans are traditionally very deeply Christian people. While the families are terribly disturbed, with absent fathers and single mothers abounding, those single mothers are extraordinarily dedicated to their kids, often to the point of despair because liberalism has already done so much damage to black families that fathers are not present. Consider  our own recent piece on this, where famous (late) rapper Tupac Shakur directly reflected on this fact – that had he had a father at home, he would have turned out as a much more discipled and better person.

The other rather amazing assertion is that BLM is a “queer-affirming” network. Sure, there are black gay people just as there are white and yellow and purple with green dots people that are also gay. That alone means nothing. But again in the United States, the majority of African American people are deeply Christian and very much not supportive of the homosexual lifestyle or marriage.

Black Lives Matter heavily supports the “transgender” people (people who have an illness called gender dysphoria, a psychological [spiritual] problem that afflicts them so badly they do not even know what sex they are.)

But of course, in liberal fashion, for BLM the cure is to blame society and preach racism and racist-style victimization of people, which they then coddle and support and nurse…

…And then turn into revolutionaries.

Has anyone heard CNN or MSNBC, or even FOX and mainstream broadcast networks talk about what is on BLM’s own site? Maybe they do not do this out of fear of blowing the narrative that there is something actually “good” and “right” about what they stand for, when what they really stand for is the destruction of anything blacks traditionaly hold dear, along with destruction of anything and everything anyone else (other than leftist loons) hold dear.

All of this, while only magnifying racism, especially if they succeed in getting the world to think that “all blacks are like this.”

They aren’t. And this is the Great Lie of Black Lives Matter. They do not matter. Only leftism, secularism, anti-Christianity, and lawlessness matter to these people. It is a pity that many people who follow this movement are willfully blind to the goals it actually has in mind for them, and for everyone else.

 

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The statements, views and opinions expressed in this column are solely those of the author and do not necessarily represent those of The Duran.

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TheDarkMan
June 14, 2020

Spot on!

Hawaiiguy
Hawaiiguy
June 15, 2020

BLM is obviously being developed from the Jewish zionist form of destruction of culture through deceit. Right out of mossad playbook, they want things to go back to normal. Pre Trump, where black lives mean nothing aside from a suckers vote, and the powerful can continue its pillaging outside the laws and media. Suckas!

Last edited 4 months ago by Hawaiiguy

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