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Nord Stream 2: why Ukraine and Poland are against it

Russian role for a gas security in Europe

10 July 2019, Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania, Lubmin: A worker is standing at the construction site of the Nord Stream 2 Baltic Sea pipeline at the pig farm. The first Russian natural gas is expected to flow through the pipeline by the end of the year. The 1,200-kilometer-long gas pipeline will transport around 55 billion cubic meters of Russian natural gas from Russia to Germany every year. Photo: Stefan Sauer/dpa-Zentralbild/ZB

Submitted by InfoBrics, authored by Lucas Leiroz, research fellow in international law at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro…

There is no doubt about the fundamental importance of the gas flow for the European energy balance. There is even less doubt about Russia’s role in this process. Western Europe is not self-sufficient in producing gas, depending on its import. It is speculated that in a long time Europe will need less and less imported gas, however, for many years it will remain dependent on this business. At this point, Russia and Europe are mutually benefited, especially when we consider Nord Stream 2.

The Nord Stream 2 project includes a gas pipeline with an annual capacity of 55 billion cubic meters, which transports gas directly from Russia to Germany. Right there, the great controversies started, raised by Western strategists concerned with the prominent role of Russia. The big problem seen by them is that the agreement would diminish the importance of Ukraine and Poland in the gas route, reducing the annual flow of these countries.

In the long run, Nord Stream 2 will change gas flows in Europe forever. Ukraine and Poland, which increasingly consolidate themselves as Russia’s geopolitical opponents, will have their role reduced, tending to disappear in a few years. This has become a cause of despair and justification for international maneuvers with the intention of boycotting the project and guaranteeing benefits for Ukraine and Poland in their relations with the West.

Above all, Nord Stream 2 will make Germany a very important country on the gas route. The agreement mutually benefits Moscow and Berlin and strengthens Russia’s ties with Europe towards a near future of political, economic and energy collaboration, lessening the inevitable instability that arises from the dependence on flows from Ukraine and Poland, considering tensions increasingly more serious between these countries and Russia – with great emphasis on Ukraine, where a conflict against Russian minorities remains unresolved in Donbass. The project is the most advanced in the ambitions of a Russian-European strategic axis.

We can then see the complete inconsistency behind the ideologies and strategic plans of the Polish and Ukrainian governments, which both deny and condemn their Slavic roots in favor of Western Europe, which they so much want to serve, and at the same time, hinder strategic planning that will benefit Europe in everything, just because it also benefits Russia. This reveals that the anti-Russian sentiment of these countries is beyond any strategic rationality, being, therefore, used by foreign forces that do not want the benefit of neither Europeans nor Russians.

Nord Stream 2 is a fundamental project for Europe’s energy security. The agreement is the only way to stabilize the European dependence on Russian gas, guaranteeing a free and safe flow, which in a short time will replace the route that has hitherto guaranteed the Ukrainian monopoly, making Kiev embark on ambitious and irresponsible anti-Russian campaigns, guaranteed by dependence on gas flow. The needs of both Europe and Russia are not in line with Ukrainian – and Polish – plans against Russia, which are strongly influenced by the US interests in the region. As Russia and Europe strengthen their ties, Kiev and Warsaw will have to make fundamental decisions, according to which they will choose between peace and security in multilateral relations or the unwanted conflict of interests.

At some point, Ukraine and Poland will realize that distancing from Russia and aligning with the West will cost them dearly, as it is with Russia, not them, that Europe has the most to profit from. Apparently, Europe has already begun to realize this reality and has done its best to maintain good relations, at least on an economic and energy level, with Moscow. What will ultimately be left to the pro-Western governments of Kiev and Warsaw will be the fundamental choice about their destinies.

If Ukraine and Poland are to return to the important role they had previously played in the energy flow, they will have to undergo a general overhaul of their political and geopolitical concepts. It is essential to understand the change that is becoming increasingly clear in the contemporary world: the transition from unipolarity to multipolarity, which is marked by the breaking of old alliances. The United States and Western Europe are becoming increasingly distant. Their interests no longer coincide, as the dynamics of contemporary geopolitics become increasingly distant from the bipolar reality of the world during the Cold War.

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Olivia Kroth
February 17, 2020

If Madam Merkel wants Nordstream 2, she will get Nordstream 2! — TASS: Merkel says Germany supports Nord Stream 2 implementation — According to Angela Merkel, Germany does not support the extraterritorial sanctions of the United States, which are targeting the participants in the Nord Stream 2 project — MOSCOW, January 11. /TASS/. Berlin rejects the sanctions against Nord Stream 2 as it is a commercial project, German Chancellor Angela Merkel said at a joint news conference with Russian President Vladimir Putin after the talks in Moscow on Saturday. “It is an economic project,” she said. “Therefore, we believe it… Read more »

Ugh...
Ugh...
Reply to  Olivia Kroth
February 18, 2020

Merkel is a windbag. I do believe Germany knows it is in their best interests to have the Nord Stream completed. US can’t compete so they “sanction away”, quite predictably. I think it will get completed, but I am waiting for news of a pipe laying ship to pick up where the spineless Swiss company left off. Words spoken by politicians are plentiful. Actions speak the loudest. As for Poland and Ukraine, their leadership is compromised. At least Poland has culture, if to overlook the negativity. As for US and Ukrainian leadership, they’re deserving of each other.

Democracy Dies Without US Diktat
Democracy Dies Without US Diktat
February 17, 2020

“The United States and Western Europe are becoming increasingly distant. Their interests no longer coincide”

The US’ best allies now are Saudi dictators and Ukrainian fascist banderites, with some light bulb self-screwing Poles thrown in to round things out, and of course all those lovely US allied fascist dictators in Central and South America are coming back into vogue again too.

paul
paul
February 17, 2020

Even during the Cold War, Russia always delivered every last gallon of oil and every cubic foot of gas it was contracted to do. Why? Not out of the goodness of their hearts – they just wanted our money. We needed their gas and they needed our money. Everybody wins. By contrast, Ukraine, Poland and the Baltics (and Bulgaria) have time and again shown themselves to be totally unreliable business partners. Ukraine refused to pay for the energy it received and stole gas in transit to Europe. Bulgaria blocked South Stream on Washington’s orders, losing a cheap and reliable source… Read more »

Olivia Kroth
Reply to  paul
February 18, 2020

Ukraine, Poland, Bulgaria, Baltics are bankrupt failed states, in contrast to the Russian Federation, which is doing well financially.

The Polish Plumber
The Polish Plumber
Reply to  Olivia Kroth
February 18, 2020

Surviving on handouts is tough, especially when the hander-outers are beginning to do the same. I think someone called it the trickle-down theory of handouts once.

How Many Poles Does........?
How Many Poles Does........?
February 18, 2020

Over a decade ago, Russia proposed to Poland to expand their pipeline capacity into Europe and the Poles refused, citing their fear of ‘little green listening menbots’ in the pipes. So now they can happily stew in their own kielbasa juice, figuring out how many Poles it takes to screw in a gas stove.

Olivia Kroth
Reply to  How Many Poles Does........?
February 19, 2020

CANONICAL LIST OF POLISH JOKES:

~1

Polish firing squad, stands in a circle.

~2

New Polish navy has glass bottom boats, to see to the old Polish navy.

~3

Polish kamikaze flew 48 successful missions.

~5

Q. How do you sink a polish battleship?
A. Put it in water.

~6

Why wasn’t Christ born in Poland?
Because they couldn’t find three wise men and a virgin.

~7

Q: How do you get a one-armed Polak out of a tree?
A: Wave to him.

The Dumping Fields
The Dumping Fields
Reply to  Olivia Kroth
February 19, 2020

Polish firing squad, stands in a circle….that’s my favorite. So true.

Although, Ukraine’s giving them a real run for their money.

Geopolitics 101
Geopolitics 101
June 7, 2020

Obviously, those two troublemaker countries want to be the gatekeepers of Russian energy into Europe. Besides the transit revenues they fear to lose, what better way to blackmail both Russia AND the US whenever the mood strikes them.

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