in ,

Is This How Europe Ends?

Will these migrants and asylum seekers become good Europeans? Or will they create in the great cities of Europe enclaves that replicate the conditions in the African and Middle East countries whence they came?

Authored by Patrick Buchanan via Buchanan.org:

“Fortress Europe is an illusion.”

So declares the Financial Times in the closing line of its Saturday editorial: “Europe Cannot Ignore Syrian Migrant Crisis.”

The FT undertakes to instruct the Old Continent on what its duty is and what its future holds: “The EU will face flows of migrants and asylum seekers across the Mediterranean for decades to come.”

Can Europe not repel this unwanted home invasion from the Global South?

It is “delusional” to think so, says the FT. Europe must be realistic and set about “providing legal routes for migrants and asylum seekers.”

What occasioned the editorial was Greece’s rough resistance to Turkish President Erdogan’s funneling of thousands of Syrian refugees, who had fled into Turkey, right up to the border with Greece.

Erdogan is threatening to inundate southeastern Europe with Syrian refugees to extract more money from the EU in return for keeping the 3.5 million Syrians already in Turkey away from EU frontiers.

Another Erdogan objective is to coerce Europe into backing his military intervention in Syria to prevent President Bashar Assad from capturing all of Idlib province and emerging victorious in his civil war.

In the human rights hellhole that is Syria today, we may see the dimensions of the disaster wrought when Wilsonian crusaders set out to depose the dictator Assad and make Syria safe for democracy.

A brief history.

When the Arab Spring erupted and protesters arose to oust Assad, the U.S., Turkey and the Gulf Arabs aided and equipped Syrian rebels willing to take up arms. The “good rebels,” however, were routed and elements of al-Qaida soon assumed dominance of the resistance.

Facing defeat, Syria’s president put out a call to his allies — Russia, Iran, Hezbollah — to save his regime. They responded, and Assad, over four years, recaptured all of Syria west of the Euphrates, save Idlib.

There, the latest fighting has pushed 900,000 more refugees to Turkey’s southern border.

The 21st-century interventions and wars of the West in the Islamic world have not gone well.

George W. Bush was goaded into invading Iraq. Barack Obama was persuaded to overthrow Colonel Moammar Gadhafi in Libya and the Assad regime in Damascus. Obama ordered U.S. forces to assist Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman in his war to crush Houthi rebels who had ousted Riyadh’s resident puppet in Yemen.

And what has the West reaped from our Mideast wars?

In Syria and Yemen, we have helped to create two of the world’s greatest human rights disasters. In Libya, we have a new civil war. In Iraq, we now battle Iran for influence inside a nation we “liberated” in 2003

In Afghanistan, we have concluded a deal with our enemy of two decades, the Taliban, that will enable us to pull our 12,000 troops out of the country in 14 months and let our Afghan allies work it out, or fight it out, with the Taliban. America is washing its hands of its longest war.

In five wars over 20 years, we lost 7,000 soldiers with some 40,000 wounded. We plunged the wealth of an empire into these wars.

And what did these wars produce for the peoples we went to aid and uplift, besides hundreds of thousands of dead Afghans and Arabs and millions of people uprooted from their homes and driven into exile?

Now, Europe is being admonished by the FT that, having done its duty by plunging into the Mideast, the continent has a new moral duty to take in the refugees the wars created, for decades to come.

But if the EU opens its doors to an endless stream of Africans and Arabs, where is the evidence that European nations will accept and assimilate them?

Will these migrants and asylum seekers become good Europeans? Or will they create in the great cities of Europe enclaves that replicate the conditions in the African and Middle East countries whence they came?

The history of the last half millennium tells the story of the rise and fall of a civilization.

In the 16th, 17th and 18th centuries, Spain, Britain, France and Portugal, and then Belgium, Italy, Germany and America, all believing in the superiority of their civilization, went out into the world to create empires to uplift and rule what Rudyard Kipling derisively called “the lesser breeds without the law.”

After two world wars, the rulers of these empires embraced a liberalism that now proclaimed the equality of all peoples, races, creeds, cultures and civilizations. This egalitarian ideology mandated the dismantling of empires and colonies as the reactionary relics of a benighted time.

Now the peoples of the new nations, dissatisfied with what their liberated lands and rulers have produced, have decided to come to Europe to enjoy in the West what they cannot replicate at home. And liberalism, the ideology of Western suicide, dictates to Europe that it take them in — for decades to come.

The colonizers of yesterday are becoming the colonized of tomorrow. Is this how the West ends?


Do You Appreciate Reading Our Emails and Website? Let us know how we are doing – Send us a Thank You Via Paypal!

0 0 vote
Article Rating
Liked it? Take a second to support The Duran on Patreon!

Report

The statements, views and opinions expressed in this column are solely those of the author and do not necessarily represent those of The Duran.

What do you think?

-16 points
Upvote Downvote
Subscribe
Notify of
guest
20 Comments
Oldest
Newest Most Voted
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Adrian Bolt
Adrian Bolt
March 11, 2020

By and large the refugees at the border with Greece are not Syrians but Afghan, Iraqi, Bangladeshi, Egyptian, etc. Many have been in Turkey for long periods living via the black economy.

ManintheMoon
ManintheMoon
Reply to  Adrian Bolt
March 11, 2020

According to the Greeks themselves, only a small minority of those arrested were Syrians – in fact there were more Turks! The answer for globalists like the FT is to make them take one or two of these charmers into their own homes.

john vieira
Reply to  ManintheMoon
March 12, 2020

That is a futile wish…maybe as a slave in shackles??? What baffles the mind is that after ridding itself of this plague not to long ago, their politicians ( Merkel, Macron etc., ) are literally ensuring the “disappearance” of their countrymen from the face of the planet…and the obviously “bemused and befuddled” electorate, devoid of their own history, as taxpayers, are unconsciously funding their OWN genocide !!!

Olivia Kroth
Reply to  john vieira
March 13, 2020

Macron and Merkel are US puppets, that is why they do not care about their own people. They are only interested in power and their own personal gain.

Roger Dixon
Roger Dixon
Reply to  Adrian Bolt
March 12, 2020

96% of the refugees currently trying to enter Greece are not Syrians.

Olivia Kroth
Reply to  Roger Dixon
March 12, 2020

No, they are not. Syrians are a small minority, the majority comes from Afghanistan, Pakistan, Turkey.

TravelAbout
TravelAbout
March 11, 2020

Again another idiot using the word regime to describe the overwhelming elected government of President Assad (verified by international observers).

Perhaps his last sentence “The colonizers of yesterday are becoming the colonized of tomorrow. Is this how the West ends?” would have been more apt if he had written “Karma comes back to the colonizers via by a suicidal combination of PC, Identity Politics & Woke-ism”.

Olivia Kroth
March 11, 2020

“In the 16th, 17th and 18th centuries, Spain, Britain, France and Portugal, and then Belgium, Italy, Germany and America ….” The term “America” is used incorrectly here. America is a continent which comprises North, Central and South America. Many nations of South and Central America were colonized, exploited, abused by European powers like Spain, France, Portugal. What the author probably meant is the USA, the United States of America, still an abusive power today, but thankfully restricted to living in the northern part of America, after having killed of most of the aboriginal Indian tribes there, the owners of the… Read more »

oldandjaded
March 11, 2020

“Or will they create in the great cities of Europe enclaves that replicate the conditions in the African and Middle East countries whence they came?”

I think what Pat meant to say is will the Imperialist powers move on to exploiting Europe like they have Africa and the middle east for the last 250 years, thereby replicating the same conditions these people are fleeing. Was that it Pat??

ManintheMoon
ManintheMoon
Reply to  oldandjaded
March 11, 2020

They aren’t fleeing generally on the whole well run European colonies, but in the main the chaos created by their own corrupt and murderous native elite who have been in charge for decades- with some help in recent decades from Europeans and Americans trying to export ‘democracy’ at a point of a gun to those whose elites weren’t subservient to the banksters.

oldandjaded
Reply to  ManintheMoon
March 11, 2020

Oh, you mean like Afghanistan for instance? Where the vast majority are coming from?
Funny, the only group the Duran hive mind likes to bash more than the US are those that their imperialism displaces…Time for the two-minute hate…

paul
paul
March 11, 2020

If you want to know the future of Europe, look at Malmo, or Rotterdam, or Stockholm, or London (now officially 40% white.)
You can’t have first world standards with third world demographics.
Europe will just be a third world hell hole, like Cairo or Islamabad without the sunshine.
Thanks to Spectre, Soros, Sarkozy, Levy and all the usual suspects.

Olivia Kroth
Reply to  paul
March 12, 2020

Look at Paris, too. It shares its Third World fate with those cities you mentioned, paul.

James Barnett
James Barnett
March 12, 2020

Buchanan is a 2011 style imperialist stooge

“Assad is a boogie man etc etc REGIME” blah blah

oldandjaded
Reply to  James Barnett
March 12, 2020

Yup. and DEEP deep state.

oldandjaded
Reply to  oldandjaded
March 12, 2020

x

Olivia Kroth
March 12, 2020

“America is washing its hands of its longest war.” No, not “America” is washing its hands but the USA is washing its hands. The continent of America comprises many states, the US being one of them, but not all.

Olivia Kroth
Reply to  Olivia Kroth
March 12, 2020

List of South American countries, North American countries and Central American countries:

List of South American Countries —

Argentina
Bolivia
Brazil
Chile
Colombia
Ecuador
Guyana
Paraguay
Peru
Suriname
Uruguay
Venezuela

xxxx

List of North American Countries —

United States
Trinidad and Tobago
St. Vincent and The Grenadines
St. Lucia
St. Kitts and Nevis
Panama
Nicaragua
Mexico
Jamaica
Honduras
Haiti
Guatemala
Grenada
El Salvador
Dominican Republic
Dominica
Cuba
Costa Rica
Canada
Bermuda
Belize
Barbados
Bahamas
Antigua and Barbuda

xxxx

List of Central American Countries —

Panama
Nicaragua
Hondurasa
Guatemala
El Salvador
Costa Rica
Belize

Olivia Kroth
Reply to  Olivia Kroth
March 12, 2020

Are all of these countries involved in long wars worldwide and “washing their hands”? No, they are not. The author of this article is writing simplistic nonsense.

Olivia Kroth
Reply to  Olivia Kroth
March 12, 2020

The author of this article seems to be a “2011 style imperialist stooge”, just like the commentator James Barnett above already said. I could not agree more with his wise comment.

Brazil deepens its alignment with the US

Merkel Expects 60-70 Per Cent of Germans to be Infected With Coronavirus