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Boris’ Brexit is almost here. Scotland, Wales & Ireland brace for big changes (Video)

The Duran Quick Take: Episode 446.

The Duran’s Alex Christoforou and Editor-in-Chief Alexander Mercouris discuss the arrival of Boris Johnson’s Brexit at month’s end and how the United Kingdom, Scotland, Northern Ireland, Wales and the Republic of Ireland will all need to adjust to a new reality in their geopolitical positions.


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Authored by Guillaume Durocher via The Unz Review:

After a great deal of delay and kvetching, Brexit is finally happening. This doesn’t mean all that much in the grand scheme of things. While leftists may hysterically accuse Boris Johnson of being “racist” – seemingly only for speaking humorously of burqas as resembling letter-boxes – the Prime Minister and his multicultural team can be counted on to pursue a policy of Globalism in One Country. The main significance is this: getting liberal/globalist elites to respect democratic outcomes even if they don’t like them. This is an important precedent.

In truth, Britain’s position within the EU but outside both the Schengen Area of free movement of people and of the Eurozone was arguably optimal. This granted London considerable influence over a major economic bloc while staying out of the zanier schemes. The only real downside of EU membership was in preventing any legal way of keeping Eastern European Gypsies out of the country.

Despite “Remoaner” hysteria, leaving the EU is not the end of the world either. I’m sure Britain will be able to get on fine outside the EU and indeed both the British and the Continentals have strong incentives to get along. Perhaps Britain will reinvent itself as a global tax haven. After all, Europe’s share of global GDP has been rapidly declining over the past decades.

Britain’s departure is a major economic blow to the EU. Brexit will leave a €7.5-billion hole in the EU budget, Britain being the biggest contributors besides the Germans. Britain was one of the EU’s few dynamic major economies (along with Germany and, to a more limited extent, France) and the only one with a semi-serious tech sector. The bloc will be reduced to 450 million inhabitants and will become a distant third in terms of GDP behind China and the United States of America.

On the positive side, Brexit may make the EU a more cohesive Union. Without Britain, the bloc is already taking a hard protectionist turn. Indeed, the Latins and Eastern Europeans are all protectionist, while Germany has a discovered a newfound interest in ‘industrial policy,’ leaving the free-trading Dutch and Nordics a small minority. While European foreign and defense policies are mostly empty talk, the EU is a genuinely powerful trade bloc, with real clout on market regulation (witness those annoying GDPR privacy popups), antitrust, anti-dumping, and trade negotiations.

Still, I would not expect miracles. Despite lack of British participation, the Continentals have yet to make anything coherent of the Eurozone. During the Cold War, Western Europeans were subject to much more significant geopolitical pressure – economic, military, and cultural dependence on the United States, a massive Soviet military threat, humiliating energy dependence on the Mideast manifest in the Oil Shocks – without this leading to any serious attempt by the Europeans to recover their sovereignty and power. The postwar European democracies were satisfied with the Pursuit of Purchasing Power. The threats of today really are less immediate or downright minor in comparison.

Charles de Gaulle at a press conference, ever pedagogical.

Brexit happening seems a good time to recall a farsighted Frenchman who predicted that none of this would work: Charles de Gaulle. President de Gaulle twice vetoed Britain’s candidacy to join the then-European Economic Community (EEC), causing an uproar in Atlanticist circles.

De Gaulle had long thought that the so-called “Europeanists” were not sincere and/or coherent in their claim to be building a strong and independent federal Europe. He said in a May 1962 press conference:

France’s proposals [on Europe] have raised two objections, which incidentally are perfectly contradictory even though they are presented by the same people. . . . These critics tell us: “You want to create a Europe of nations, while we want to create supranational Europe.” As if a simple phrase were sufficient to confound these powerfully established entities that are the nations and the States. And then, these same critics simultaneously tell us: “England has submitted its candidacy to join the [European] Common Market. So long as they are not in, we won’t be able to do anything political.”

And yet, everyone knows that England, as a great State and a nation true to itself, will never consent to being dissolved in some utopian construct.

Prescient words!

The British comedy show Yes, Minister! has a scene very humorously making the same point.

Six months later, De Gaulle vetoed Britain’s entry of the EEC, citing British ties to the United States, economic relations with the Commonwealth, and general differences with those he called “the Continentals.” In January 1963, De Gaulle said that in the event of British membership:

We can expect that the cohesion of all the members, which would be very numerous and very diverse, would not last long and that, in the end, there would emerge a colossal Atlantic Community under American dependence and leadership, which would soon absorb the European Community.

This eventuality may appear perfectly legitimate in the eyes of some, but it is not at all what France wished to do and has done, which is a genuinely European construct.

In short, De Gaulle accused the British of being a kind of American Trojan Horse . . . and who could blame him?

In 1967, De Gaulle again vetoed British membership citing basically the same concerns. Britain could not join the EEC unless Britain either changed or “if the Continentals forever gave up on creating a Europe which is European.” Historically, the latter view prevailed.

As a rule, the early “European federalists” were never interested in creating a strong and independent Europe. Like Jean Monnet and Walter Hallstein, they were just Atlanticist networkers, whose personal prosperity depended on these deracinated and foreign circles, rather than on Europe’s native power. I cannot tell you how revolted I was when I tried to read the memoirs of both Monnet (600 pages of nothing) and Hallstein (who claimed, in 1970s, when the EEC was barely an entity at all, that the Europeans were “halfway” to federation and just needed one last push to get there).

Anyway, Britain’s departure from the European Union opens the way for the Continentals to try, a bit more earnestly, to create a truly sovereign and independent “European Europe.” This is not an absurd ambition. London was in some ways Europe’s only top-tier “global city.” Paris, Berlin, and Brussels really are secondary nodes. There’s a charmingly provincial quality to European politics which must be preserved. While in the Anglosphere Jews and Asians have massively displaced White Gentiles among their cultural and economic elites, the same is not really true in Continental Europe, certainly outside of France. Time will tell.

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The statements, views and opinions expressed in this column are solely those of the author and do not necessarily represent those of The Duran.

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Trader Joe
Trader Joe
January 27, 2020

Trump promised Boris to relax the USDA inspection rules on hagas imports and Boris promised to boost its twinky imports by 1000%. There’s the extent of your new ‘trade deal’, Brits. 😉

oldandjaded
Reply to  Trader Joe
January 29, 2020

What the HELL is “hagas”?? ???? Its haggis. Besides, haggis isn’t British, its SCOTTISH. And yes, my heritage is Scottish, we used to eat haggis every Robby Burns day. I used to look forward to January 25th with dread. LOL!

The World
The World
January 27, 2020

“In short, De Gaulle accused the British of being a kind of American Trojan Horse . . . and who could blame him?”

As if we needed De Gaulle to point out the obvious.

oldandjaded
Reply to  The World
January 27, 2020

or visa-versa? like trying to separate the white from the rice.

Poland
Poland
Reply to  The World
January 28, 2020

Ve vill outBrit the Brits! Ve is der new Amerikan Trojan Horse in der EU!

Olivia Kroth
Reply to  Poland
January 28, 2020

Oh, oh!

oldandjaded
January 27, 2020

“The main significance is this: getting liberal/globalist elites to respect democratic outcomes even if they don’t like them. This is an important precedent.” That’s it, right there. The brutal fact is the people in the UK will not be meaningfully better off, in real terms they will be simply changing out the middle management, from the EU to being directly under the thumb of the US. Other than that, not much will fundamentally change. But its all about the symbolism, and that big “F*ck you” to the long term system of supra-national control is happening all over the place, and… Read more »

Janice
Janice
January 28, 2020

I am English living in Scotland, it appears that you only discussed the view point from an England’s propaganda news media point of view about Scotland rather than what is actually happening here in Scotland, the snp are having their feet held to the fire more day by day by the people of Scotland, there is a lot of propaganda south of the border in England about Scotland, perhaps you should watch AUOB marches to get a better idea of what the Scottish people think, not the snp, I believe they have discussed the future ways they can become independent… Read more »

Smoking Eagle
Smoking Eagle
Reply to  Janice
January 29, 2020

Did you see the petition to the UK government to allow the north of England to secede from the UK and join Scotland? This petition only started in June 2016 but it had 53,070 supporters. It probably would have had many thousands more if people had known about it. https://www.change.org/p/the-uk-government-allow-the-north-of-england-to-secede-from-the-uk-and-join-scotland I love the comment: “It would solve all of this country’s problems if we could dig a big trench around London and push it out to sea with a long stick. It can be a horrible little tax retreat for the ultra-rich and we can get back to having a… Read more »

Smoking Eagle
Smoking Eagle
January 28, 2020

When people are talking about Ireland not being British I would like a distinction would made between the geographical and the political. Ireland is the send-largest island in the British Archipelago so everyone from Ireland or anywhere else in the archipelago is therefore British. The largest island includes England, Scotland and Wales so these three countries are British since they form part of the island of Great Britain. Southern Ireland is not part of the United Kingdom but it is still part of the British Archipelago. The Channel Islands are not part of the British Archipelago but they are part… Read more »

Janice
Janice
Reply to  Smoking Eagle
January 28, 2020

The word British or later the word uk only came into being because of the treaty of the Union, if Scotland did decide to go its own way then Britain by name and country ceases to exist. Wales was annexed to England before the Treaty of the Union was signed, after it was signed then the union became known as Great Britain in 1707, after that Ireland was added. Research is one of my hobbies as I am keen on archaeology and I don’t always get it right, sometimes what we were taught and what we are led to believe… Read more »

Smoking Eagle
Smoking Eagle
Reply to  Janice
January 29, 2020

My point was not a political one. The point is that the British Archipelago comprises thousands of islands and all of these islands are British because together they form the British archipelago / the British Isles. No, the word “British” did not come into being because of the Union. The islands were named after the Priteni, an ancient name for the inhabitants of the islands. This means that Priteni was pre-Roman. The Romans called it Britannia. The Romans called the island of Great Britain “Britannia”; Ireland was known as “Hibernia”. As for Scotland, Scotia is a name derived from Scoti,… Read more »

Olivia Kroth
January 28, 2020

Almost there! Yes! I hope and keep my fingers crossed that all will go well with BREXIT! Hurray! And then hopefully France, Greece, Hungary will follow? FREXIT! GREXIT! HUNGXIT! Hurray! Hurray! Hurray! And when we will have gotten rid of the vile EU, then we must also abolish NATO (North Atlantic Terrorist Organization).

Janice
Janice
January 30, 2020

I suppose if you are to go as far back as roman times to make the point of what Scotland was called, the Romans also called it pictavia, there is still a place in Scotland known as pictavia, other names known for Scotland include Caledonia, there is still a area in Scotland known as Caledonia forest, although not much of the forest is left nowadays, or the other name was alba, the problem is nobody asked the people who lived here at that time what they called their country, certainly when Bede visited Scotland to bring Christianity he mentions the… Read more »

Olivia Kroth
Reply to  Janice
February 1, 2020

Once, German and French territory belonged to the Roman Empire, and yet they are separate entities today. If we go back to the Ice Ages, no territory had any political affiliation. If we go back to the times before the Earth existed , then we will find out – what?

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