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François Hollande’s failed presidency enters its final weeks

The French President Francois Hollande has entered the final weeks of his presidency, which will leave only one trace in history, the one of epic failure.

Let’s not forget that Hollande was elected by default, thanks to the removal of Dominique Strauss-Kahn from the political arena and the rejection ofNicolas Sarkozy. In the case with Strauss-Khan, Hollande played his part of dirty tricks.

Despite Hollande’s jovial look, little belly, and bad jokes, he is, in fact, one hell of a plotter.
 His entire career was made in the shadows, where he compensated his lack of charisma by sowing internal disputes and playing people against each other.

As soon as Dominique Strauss-Kahn fell into this trap in New York, Hollande organized a second round of national scandals and then seized the opportunity of his life by becoming president. A lot of his former friends used to say that he didn’t want the power of the presidency, but enjoyed the status, which certainly appears to be accurate.

Unable to make decisions, Hollande governed following the wind, with a great talent for creating smoke screens and diverting attention away from the failures of his policies. The psychodrama of “le marriage pour tous” was a good example.
 France was already in the hole when Hollande took power, he just made it deeper, paving the way for Macron, who will likely keep on digging.

Not only did Hollande betray all his electoral promises, which, as Mitterrand used to say, are made to be elected, not fulfilled, but he also killed what was left of the French diplomacy.During the Syria and Ukraine crisis, Hollande barked like an indicative pug, sometimes even getting ahead of his American masters and Saudi sponsors. Remember his postures on Syria? He nearly spearheaded the war against Syria, almost going in alone before realizing that France had used most of its munitions during the Mali operation. He was saved by the withdrawal of the US and the Brits after Putin’s brilliant move on the destruction of Syria’s chemical weapons.

During the Syria and Ukraine crisis, Hollande barked like an indicative pug, sometimes even getting ahead of his American masters and Saudi sponsors. Remember his postures on Syria? He nearly spearheaded the war against Syria, almost going in alone before realizing that France had used most of its munitions during the Mali operation. He was saved by the withdrawal of the US and the Brits after Putin’s brilliant move on the destruction of Syria’s chemical weapons.

Hollande was the one who promised the delivery of Mistrals to Russia before bending to Obama’s demands and destroying hundreds of French jobs.
 He participated, with the help of his economy minister, Emmanuel Macron, in the destruction of one of France’s industrial flagships, Alstom, which was sold to General Electric, leading to the loss of even more jobs.

Last, but not least, Hollande destroyed what was left of the “French left”, the Socialist Party. He used his talent for intrigues by manipulating the socialist primaries, laying traps for his prime minister, and favoring the victory of Benoit Hamon, whom he knew was going the put the last nail in the socialist coffin. He didn’t organize it just for fun, but to open the road to his successor, Emmanuel Macron, who came out of nowhere.

If you look at the timing, Macron started to emerge after the victory of Fillon at the right’s primary, where he beat Juppé, who is the man of Washington. The system, however, has a way of crushing those who place it in danger. Of course, Hollande had a leading role in the outrageous campaign against Fillon, as it has been proven that the leaks against him came from the presidential palace.

The recent posture of the French president regarding the chemical attack in Idlib, including Hollande’s threat to Russia of war crime tribunal
s, are nothing more than gesticulations of a sad clown who always thought that satisfying his masters will make him look more important than he could ever hope to be on his own.

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Jean-Michel Cosnuau
French political analyst and writer atThe Duran