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The Election of 1824 may be our prototype for the Great Steal [Video]

While the mainstream media insists there is nothing to see and no hope that Donald Trump may yet win the Presidency, the mechanisms placed in our election system by the Constitution speak volumes otherwise. We wish to present a brief history lesson about a time earlier in the US’ history where a severely contested election happened, and what took place. We offer comment at the end.

This comes from the website EdSitement at neh.gov, and on Wikipedia, and we are grateful for the content given from both sites.


The Presidential Election of 1824: The Election is in the House

John Quincy Adams defeated Andrew Jackson in 1824

John Quincy Adams defeated Andrew Jackson in 1824 by garnering more electoral votes through the House of Representatives, even though Jackson originally received more popular and electoral votes. – courtesy Library of Congress

John Quincy Adams defeated Andrew Jackson in 1824 by garnering more electoral votes through the House of Representatives, even though Jackson originally received more popular and electoral votes.

The presidential election of 1824 represents a watershed in American politics. The collapse of the Federalist Party and the illness of the “official candidate” of the Democratic-Republicans led to a slate of candidates who were all Democratic-Republicans. This led to the end of the Congressional Caucus system for nominating candidates, and eventually, the development of a new two-party system in the United States. In the election, Andrew Jackson won a plurality of both the popular and electoral vote. But John Quincy Adams became president. Four crucial elements of our election system were highlighted in the election of 1824: the nomination of candidates, the popular election of electors, the Electoral College, and the election of the president in the House when no candidate receives a majority in the Electoral College.
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The statements, views and opinions expressed in this column are solely those of the author and do not necessarily represent those of The Duran.

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