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Protecting the American Opium Trade

Official history makes frequent references to the British tea trade as a vital part of the British empire in the 1800s. It’s hard to understand how trading tea could be so profitable, until one learns that opium was a major component of the tea trade.

Opium is a powerful and addictive pain killer that is often refined into heroin. It was banned by governments a century ago, but the opium trade continues to this day with secret approval by government officials.

The American government has used the US military to protect the opium trade for two centuries and evidence shows this continues. The extent of this protection is open for debate, but if one connects the dots the image is ugly.

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Olivia Kroth
July 12, 2020

“The US American government has used the US military to protect the opium trade for two centuries and evidence shows this continues.”

Therefore the USA has a drug crisis. The US is killing its own people.

John Ellis
Reply to  Olivia Kroth
July 12, 2020

Not so, for the voting majority, the 51% most wealthy, they are using drugs to help commit genocide on the 49% working-poor.

Think about it, for the 25% ruling-class make a profit with drugs, the 50% laboring-class suffer misery by drugs and our greed-driven middle-class is totally indifferent to the evil done by drugs.

John Ellis
July 12, 2020

Simple solution would be for voters to not let the rich fund elections or to hold public office. But that is impossible, as the public worships the rich and desires above all things to be rich.

Olivia Kroth
Reply to  John Ellis
July 12, 2020

Being rich is nice, John. I see nothing wrong with it.

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