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Kherson, Pavlovka and General Surovikin to bring focus to operation

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Kherson, Pavlovka and General Surovikin to bring focus to operation
The Duran: Episode 1433

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The statements, views and opinions expressed in this column are solely those of the author and do not necessarily represent those of this site. This site does not give financial, investment or medical advice.

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penrose
penrose
November 12, 2022

The “Miracle of Dunkirk” was Germany not being willing to slaughter the British Soldiers, which they could have done.

PutinOnTheRitz
PutinOnTheRitz
Reply to  penrose
November 12, 2022

“The “Miracle of Dunkirk” was Germany not being willing to slaughter the British Soldiers, which they could have done.”

And should have done. As evidenced by the regret expressed by German generals once they saw those exact same British troops being subsequently re-equipped and sent right back into battle.

PutinOnTheRitz
PutinOnTheRitz
Reply to  PutinOnTheRitz
November 12, 2022

By the way, the retreat from Dunkirk was “successful” only because Hitler ALLOWED IT to be so, given he still held hope at that point in time that the British could be swayed into either joining Germany or at the very least remaining neutral.

platon
platon
Reply to  PutinOnTheRitz
November 13, 2022

Had Mr Hitler never heard the epithet ‘Perfidious Albion’?

John Ellis
John Ellis
November 12, 2022

But surely, 300 thousand troops, 300 thousand veteran and well-equipped troops, all combat ready and about to explode into action, surely this gives us no motivation to reflect negatively on what our heroes may have done in the past.
Eat your heart out naysayers, eat your heart out,

Last edited 2 months ago by John Ellis
PutinOnTheRitz
PutinOnTheRitz
November 12, 2022

“Kherson, Pavlovka and General Surovikin to bring focus to operation” Right. Don’t start your ‘Special Military Operation’ with absolute total focus …wait instead until you’re a full 8 months into the conflict before bringing it in. By the way, has anyone bothered to actually look at a satellite map of the area surrounding Kherson? I ask because I did and there is nothing but flat, open farmland for hundreds of miles both west and north of it. Treeless farmland, I might add. No military force could ever hope to advance in such open terrain against an adversary that enjoys total… Read more »

john plum
john plum
Reply to  PutinOnTheRitz
November 13, 2022

Moving forward into enemy territory to establish new fronts requires possibility of furnishing sufficient supply lines. That problem, due to geography of the river, and timing of seasons, is why Kherson retreat was a good idea.

As to focus, that is the words pf the Duran. Nonetheless, one always re-focuses, according to the eventual, which cannot be predicted absolutely, only envisaged.

‘Delays’ happen for many reasons, seasons, permitting room for negotiations – understanding the intentions of your enemy (regarding negotiations and support from ‘allies’).

Last edited 2 months ago by john plum
PutinOnTheRitz
PutinOnTheRitz
November 12, 2022

“Intercepting” incoming enemy missiles is only a temporary battlefield solution. The permanent solution is to locate and destroy said missile’s launch sites …which should be an easy task, especially in a case like this where all the launch locations are within Ukraine itself. Anything launched from outside Ukraine would automatically signal the involvement of foreign countries …thus putting said foreign countries at risk of suffering retaliation.

john plum
john plum
Reply to  PutinOnTheRitz
November 13, 2022

Good point. I wonder myself HOW easy that would be (keeping an open mind). I have had some clues to this, and to the mobility and detection of launch machinery and transporting vehicles. They are not stationary launch pads with fondations in the ground, and cannot be observed when moving without some sort of clear identification. Well, the Ukranians/British do not of course permit that identification to be easily visible.

PutinOnTheRitz
PutinOnTheRitz
November 12, 2022

Blowing up a bridge signals that you’re terrified of enemy forces chasing you across it, right into your own territory. It’s a last-ditch reaction and means you won’t be able to subsequently use it ever again in future counterattack efforts. How did the Ukrainians even manage to get to said bridges across hundreds of miles of open terrain when Russia allegedly enjoys absolute air supremacy?
This whole ‘conflict’ stinks to high heaven.

Last edited 2 months ago by PutinOnTheRitz
john plum
john plum
Reply to  PutinOnTheRitz
November 13, 2022

I don’t think its a matter of hundreds of miles distance for Ukrainian troops to the bridge to be governed by air supremacy. Aircraft can be shot down by personnel on front lines from the ground. Air supremacy generally means supremacy over the air, in regard to another’s air force overall. I do wonder why they blew up the bridge though, unless there was immanent threat of attack upon the last of rear-guard forces, who instead blew up the bridge, and left by air themselves. Could not additional planes and artillery in Ukrainian direction keep Ukrainian forces well bay for… Read more »

PutinOnTheRitz
PutinOnTheRitz
November 12, 2022

My personal take-away from the Kherson Fiasco is that either:
A) Russia’s military capabilities and prowess have been vastly exaggerated
or
B) Russia is pulling its punches, for some dark undiscernible reason.

PutinOnTheRitz
PutinOnTheRitz
November 12, 2022

Here’s yet another problem that you guys are conveniently avoiding addressing: If the USSA and the EU openly state that they want to hurt Russia and then go on to openly provide Ukraine with weapons, training, logistical support, spare parts …then said nations ARE EFFECTIVELY & OPENLY AT WAR AGAINST RUSSIA.

Why does Russia refuse to acknowledge this reality?

john plum
john plum
Reply to  PutinOnTheRitz
November 13, 2022

I think they do acknowledge it to themselves. Putin also stated that much openly a couple of months or so ago – ‘war against the Western Coalition and also in form of NATO’ Its worth re-iterating plainly, I think, Thanks. Its true whsat you say, and ,many folk find it hard to acknowledge. Nontheless, there is a difference to varied extent, in effectively at war using proxies and providing assistance, and openly declared war. IN general the acknowledgment is kept silent in that way, at least for a while, in order to avoid greater and sudden escalation, if it is… Read more »

waine
waine
November 12, 2022

Putting the PR debacle to one side, Russia can and will destroy the Ukraine in it’s own time, I for one would have liberated Donesk first, getting rid of those Ukies Nazis who are killing civilians on a daily basis.

waine
waine
November 13, 2022

There is a time for diplomacy and a time for real action, and that time should have commenced a long time ago. It’s just a pity that Putin still calls the west “his partners ” when is he going to wake up, he dosen’t have friends in the west.

PutinOnTheRitz
PutinOnTheRitz
November 13, 2022

Russia’s situation is akin to that of a man who gets into a fight with another man, then ten of the other guy’s buddies jump in to help him, but you go on pretending that you’re still fighting only one guy.

Good luck with that.

john plum
john plum
Reply to  PutinOnTheRitz
November 13, 2022

Yeah it is like that, but it was always the Western Globalist coalition, all the time, using Ukraine. Russia knew that always. The only did and still do not know to what those powers will eventually resort to. I think they are patient, and that’s OK, as well as anticipating all possible next moves. They have more buddies rooting for them now, then if they jumped in at the start, full on, years back , or even last February.

john plum
john plum
November 13, 2022

DUnkirk was a defeat because it was a failed attempt to establish a successful landing accross water. Kherson is rather different. It is possible to argue the Kherson retreat is not a defeat. Dunkirk was not the only evacuation in the history of Russian, Ottoman and British Armies, and many times an orderly retreat was made as a strategic manoeuvre, in order to strengthen their hand. Unless and until the Ukrainian army is on the verge of complete collapse or defeat, it is always possible that some part of the Russian army finds itself in a position where threatened without… Read more »

Last edited 2 months ago by john plum
john plum
john plum
November 13, 2022

There are always unplanned constraints and more than a few possible causes for escalations in these affairs. The nature of a military adventure will change as time goes on unless swift. It could not have been swift in Ukraine for Russia, unless Ukraine quickly and honourably got down to diplomatic talks for good purpose. That chance had to be given. It seems that too much of the commentary and analysis is trying to always be ahead of Russian military decision-making. That is rather trite. Why should Russia assume that, for example, Britain and US will send their own soldiers in uniform,… Read more »

Last edited 2 months ago by john plum
john plum
john plum
November 13, 2022

I think Russia will declare war with Ukraine in escalation (and likelihood has increased for them) when the time is right regarding would-be allies, and then only after they have commenced with moves for massive escalation, by sea and air as well as land to provide men and supplies in a storm. They will also have to do so, ensuring that Russian homeland is properly defended from NATO conventional (non-nuclear) attack. I am sure NATO now has constantly ready attack plans on Russia as an internally militarily weakened defence, should they escalate the war with Ukraine using more military power.… Read more »

Last edited 2 months ago by john plum
john plum
john plum
November 13, 2022

Look, neither Russia nor the Western coalition cans defeat each other in short time. Russia is used to this scenario. This is the same as the Ottomans and Russia, who were at war more or less for 5 hundred years. Why should the Russians hurry and mobilise in June at latest, not in September? They are constantly reading there whole enemy at work, and their options.

Last edited 2 months ago by john plum
Tom
Tom
November 13, 2022

scoring political points to sustain the narrative Ukraine is winning.

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