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Hungarian Minister Challenges CNN’s “Fake News” About Suspending Parliament

Has to explain to Christiane Amanpour how democracy works.

During an appearance on Christiane Amanpour’s show, Hungarian minister Péter Szijjártó challenged CNN’s “fake news” about Hungary suspending its own parliament.

Last month, CNN and a host of other news networks suggested that the decision represented a “coup” and evidence that Prime Minister Viktor Orban was behaving like a dictator.

In reality, the decision was passed by parliament itself and had the support of around 90% of Hungarians. The parliament can also vote to lift the decree whenever it chooses. Hardly a dictatorship.

The law was passed to give Orban extra powers to deal with the coronavirus crisis.

“Furthermore, the law does not dissolve parliament but instead requires the government to remain in constant consultation with parliament members, which means parliament continues to meet in-person and work with the government in the fight against the coronavirus,” reports ReMix. “Many other countries have also enacted similar measures to help governments respond quickly to the crisis.”

During the CNN interview, Amanpour asked Hungarian Minister of Foreign Affairs and Trade Péter Szijjártó why parliament is closed.

“Ok, that’s news to us,” said Szijjártó, explaining how he had spoken to parliament five times already that week.

“I read these reports and I have to tell you that these reports never speak about the truth… given the fact that there are four countries in the European Union applying a similar kind of solution: Poland, Malta, Croatia, and us,” Szijjártó said.

“And there are four other [European] countries in which the government can go along with the state of emergency or state of danger without any kind of decision made by the parliament,” he added.

After Amanpour tried to suggest that because the ruling conservative Fidesz party has a two thirds majority in parliament, the state of emergency would never be lifted, Szijjártó had to explain to her how democracy works.

“First of all, the composition of the Parliament is not an outcome of a lottery, but elections. So, I think it is kind of natural that in a parliament there is majority and there is a minority, and the majority is definitely for the government… Many media outlets have spread lies and fake news around this law,” Szijjártó said, noting that government power is not unlimited.

“One of these fake news items is that it says that the government has an uncontrolled and unlimited possibility to make decrees, which is not true,” Szijjártó said. “The law says very clearly that we can make decrees only in accordance with protecting the people, the country and the economy from the challenges related to the virus.”

Hungary is often targeted by globalist media outlets because it has remained steadfast against the migrant invasion and Orban has overseen the institution of populist, pro-family policies that are at odds with the internationalist, open borders model.

https://summit.news/2020/04/27/hungarian-minister-challenges-cnns-fake-news-about-suspending-parliament/

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ted richard
ted richard
April 28, 2020

always judge the source

amnapour has been a well known globalist deep state media TOOL for a few decades.

anyone consenting to be interviewed by her …that hold disparate opinions from her ;;;;handlers;;;; should expect …..straw man questions/arguments and a host of disnfo applied during the interview in an effort to discredit them outright or hold them to ridicule.

in other words if you consent for her to be the interviewer you are damn fool.

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