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German election: first assessment – Germany shifts right

German election: first assessment – Germany shifts right

Though the final result has not yet been confirmed statements from German political leaders – including Merkel herself, who has spoken of a ‘disappointing’ result for the CDU/CSU – suggest that the final outcome will differ little from that suggested by the exit polls.

The final outcome of the election is therefore an end to the ‘grand coalition’ between Merkel’s CDU/CSU and the left wing SPD, which has suffered one of the worst electoral results in its history, but with the CDU/CSU almost certainly lacking enough support to form a majority coalition in the Bundestag with the FDP.

Since bringing either the right wing AfD or the left wing Left Party into the ruling coalition is categorically ruled out – and would be rejected by those parties if it were ever offered to them – that means that the only chance of a majority coalition is one which includes the Green Party.

Such a coalition would be difficult to achieve.  The Green Party emerged in the 1980s as an anti-establishment leftist party well to the left of the SPD.  Whilst it has long since put its origins behind it – today it is very much a part of the German establishment and is indeed by many measures the most pro-US, ‘liberal interventionist’ and anti-Russian party in Germany – much of its electoral support continues to be drawn on the basis of its old anti-establishment past.  How its supporters will react to it entering into a coalition with the arch-establishment CDU/CSU and FDP remains to be seen, and as of the time of writing it is not a foregone conclusion that this will happen.

Needless to say, if a coalition with the Greens cannot be patched up, Germany’s future CDU/CSU/FDP government will lack a majority in the Bundestag, making it even less stable that it would be with the Greens in the coalition, and even less likely to forge ahead with fundamental changes to Germany’s established positions.

The inescapable fact of the German election is that Germany has shifted decisively to the right.  The only two parties which have achieved gains in the election are the AfD, which by German standards is right wing, and the FDP, which is centre-right.

By contrast the traditional standard bearer of the left – the SPD – has fallen back, as has the CDU/CSU at the centre.

The right wing shift has however proved insufficient to dethrone the CDU/CSU from its position at the heart of German politics, increasing the sense of paralysis which is at the heart of Germany’s problems.

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That means that some of the changes some people have been willing on Germany are now all but impossible.

With the ruling coalition lacking a stable majority even if the Greens can be induced to join it, and with a strong anti-EU party in the form of the AfD now in the Bundestag and threatening the CDU in its conservative heartlands, it beggars belief that Germany will for example agree to the sort of all-embracing changes to the EU institutions demanded by French President Macron.

Needless to say any prospect of a softening of the German line towards Britain with regard to Brexit, or towards Greece in relation to its bailout, can now be ruled out.

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samo war
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samo war

&

DS Analysis
Guest
DS Analysis

The war is lost. The US is doing what the Nazis did in Berlin. They are killing for no reason. Prolonging the killing. Fuck them and they can go to hell

Constantine
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Constantine

The SPD is a neoliberal right-wing party all right, masquerading as a center-leftist social-democratic one. Ditto for the Green Party (unlike the Greens in the US, for example).

DS Analysis
Guest
DS Analysis

The top 2 parties are center left globalist puppets who take their order from DC. One fakes left, one fakes right. Same as the whole of western Europe, Canada, Australia, Scandinavia also.

Constantine
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Constantine

SPD is not center-leftist or anything leftist. Most of the political spectrum in Germany and elsewhere has moved towards the neoliberal right so that neoliberal policies won’t be perceived as the purview of a certain party or coalition, but as a product of consensus between all the ”respectable” and somber democratic parties of the ”Left” and the Right.

DS Analysis
Guest
DS Analysis

These NGO’s who are illegally ferrying illiterate subsistence farmers away from their communities where they are needed and dumping them into the streets of Europe, are doing it at the behest of DC. The whole goal here and of the Ukraine war is to weaken Europe. It was getting too strong.

A guest worker program with a path to citizenship is how you move people. Not through migration anarchy.

Anyway Merkel lost some power but NOT NEARLY ENOUGH. THIS IS SICK ! THIS IS A POLITICAL FAILURE.

Le Ruse
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Le Ruse

Mutti, still in charge…More refugees coming to Mutti ??

JNDillard
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JNDillard

Mercouris is correct: Germany is shifting to the right. This is likely to continue as the US/Atlanticist umbrella which has shielded Germans since WWII is shredded. Add to that the prospect of a long-overdue world-wide depression and you have more reason for a conservative shift. There are, however, two possible mitigating factors: the first is the likelihood that the worst of the influx of immigation, from which the AfD draws most of its strength, is over, meaning the AfD has probably peaked. The second is Chinese/Russian One Belt One Road. Germany is basically run by its industrial base and its… Read more »

Daisy Adler
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Daisy Adler

Angela Merkel CDU-CSU coalition lost 10 points, . compared to the previous election, won with 42.5%, meaning they lost 25% of voters. Besides, she has no partners to put up a coalition in order to govern, which must have at least 51% of the Bundestag. That only proves what a sinister joke the “democracy” is, when a leader with a third of popular approval can impose her will on a whole people and country. The same with Macron in France, where his support was only of 23% in the first round. The second barely counts, because is not based on… Read more »

Keith Smith
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Keith Smith

This is pretty big, 13% of the total vote for the far right is v similar to the numbers UKIP got in 2015 GE. Will the momentum of nationalism be halted here again tho?

hvaiallverden
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hvaiallverden

Wanna bet on any “change”, huh, I bet that absolutely, definitively, and by all historical preferences that nothing, absolutely nothing will change, and this “alt-right” is an scam, and one must never forget Germany is occupied territory where the inhabitants have nothing to say, what so ever.
Merkel is an Israeli bitch, along with the other rotten heap of shit called Trumpstein.

peace

Peaceful Prosperity
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Peaceful Prosperity

There are some troubling news about the Afd from Aangirfan blogger, maybe it’s all just “smokes and mirrors”:

Alice Weidel, worked for Goldman Sachs, is openly gay, is apparently of Jewish origin, “employed a Syrian asylum seeker at her home in Switzerland.”
AfD candidates “claim they are the real defenders of Jews against reactionary Muslim fundamentalists.”

I guess will see who they really are soon…

Marc Leif
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Marc Leif

Very true. Internet censorship is coming very, very fast. The “West” will be locked up behind a “silicon curtain.”

Vera Gottlieb
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Vera Gottlieb

Just because the CDU/CSU and SPD lost voters doesn’t mean a shift to the right. Yes, the AfD comes into the Bundestag, but all other parties stayed about the same, with the FDP back on the scene. The AfD came in with a little over 12% – so this number does NOT represent a shift to the right. However, it will be very interesting to see how all this develops. There is big discord within the ranks of the AfD.

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