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Japan to drop billions on American missile defense radar purchase

Japan to drop billions on American missile defense radar purchase

Japan and American haven’t exactly been seeing eye to eye lately with Trump’s trade tariffs and all, but one thing they can hold hands over is blowing lots of big bucks for defense against the countries that America doesn’t like.

Japan and China, and Japan and North Korea, have been eyeing each other with suspicion for a long time, and America has recently discovered that China is a threat to American hegemonic security. And the North Koreans are still bad guys as long as they still have nuclear capabilities.

For these reasons, Japan is gearing up to drop several billion worth of greenbacks on an American manufactured radar missile defense system, or maybe a couple of them.

The Japan Times reports:

Japan will this week pick a U.S.-made advanced radar for its multibillion-dollar missile-defense system, an upgrade that could help ease trade friction with Washington and provide cutting-edge protection against the arsenals of North Korea and China, sources said.

“Aegis will be a big-ticket purchase; it will be a nice gift for President Trump,” a Japanese government official said, referring to the ground-based Aegis Ashore system.

Japanese officials could make their radar choice as early as Monday for two Aegis Ashore batteries it wants to deploy in 2023. That means the purchase can be added to a defense budget proposal slated for release in August, according to three sources with knowledge of the plan who declined to be identified because they are not authorized to speak to the media.

The candidates are Raytheon Co’s SPY-6 and a version of Lockheed Martin Corp.’s Long Range Discrimination Radar (LRDR), the sources said. Japan had sought the SPY-6 when it agreed to buy Aegis Ashore last year, but Washington was reluctant to supply it.

The Japanese budget proposal comes amid an easing of tensions following the June 12 meeting in Singapore between President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un.

Although Japanese military planners still see North Korea as an immediate danger, they view China’s growing military power as a bigger long-term threat.

The People’s Liberation Army Rocket Force controls an arsenal of hundreds of ballistic missiles that could reach Japan. Upgrades to Japan’s missile-defense system would make it one of the world’s most advanced.

Japanese defense officials have estimated the cost of the two Aegis Ashore batteries at about $2 billion. The final tally, including the SPY-6 or LRDR, which can detect targets several times farther away than existing Aegis systems operated by Japan or the U.S., could be at least twice that, the sources said.

Although the upgrade adds expense, it fits with Trump’s stated desire to export more American military hardware.

In a visit to Tokyo in November, he welcomed Japan’s procurement of F-35 stealth fighters and urged Japan to buy more U.S. weapons and goods.

Trump has since cranked up pressure on Tokyo with tariffs on steel, threats of levies on car imports and calls for a bilateral trade deal between the two countries.

At a joint news conference with Prime Minister Shinzo Abe in June, Trump said Abe had pledged to buy “billions and billions of dollars of additional products of all kinds.”

Abe may meet Trump again around the time of the United Nations General Assembly meeting in New York in September, a Japanese government official said. He declined to say what the two leaders would discuss.

Raytheon and Mitsubishi Heavy Industries developed Aegis Ashore’s SM-3 Block IIA missiles; Lockheed Martin is the prime contractor.

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The SPY-6 radar is designed for the U.S. Navy’s fleet of Aegis-equipped warships. The LRDR will be integrated into the U.S. Ground-Based Midcourse Defense anti-ballistic missile system in Alaska by 2020.

Both cutting-edge radars will allow Japan to make full use of new longer-range interceptors and could be used to defend against any future threat posed by Chinese missiles.

Japan’s military procurement proposals for the year starting April 1 come on the heels of Kim’s pledge in Singapore to work toward the denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula. Trump in return ordered a halt to large-scale military drills with South Korea.

Japan, which hosts about 50,000 U.S. military personnel, including the biggest overseas concentration of U.S. Marines and a U.S. Navy carrier strike group, has said it would not change its military posture until it see concrete signs that Pyongyang is prepared to permanently dismantle its nuclear weapons and ballistic missile programs.

“Aegis Ashore will go ahead because Japan needs it,” one of the sources said.

Plus, American arms manufacturers could use a little bit more business, hence the impetus to get together and help ensure that the tensions that create these problems stay in good strong effect, or at least forecasted since confidence is sort of low that they’ll get resolved soon. Granted, it’s just an upgrade, but it’s good and expensive and it represents profits for American arms makers and still has a good spot in Japanese foreign policy (and America’s).

 

 

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WillDippelbluewaterJohn MasonJohn VuVince Dhimos Recent comment authors
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WillDippel
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WillDippel

Here is an interesting look at the compensation paid to the Named Executive Officers at each of the five biggest American defense companies:

http://viableopposition.blogspot.ca/2017/11/the-big-business-of-american-defense.html

Thanks to the spending of taxpayer’s hard earned dollars by Washington, a few American executives are greatly enriching themselves.

bluewater
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bluewater

Rockefellers/israel would do another Fukushima…..if they do not do what they are told.
All BANKS in JAPAN since ww2 are controlled by Rockefeller

John Mason
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John Mason

All the more reasons for Russia to hold onto the Kiril islands. One would have thought that the Japanese would have given the US their marching orders already but it must be a symptom of servitude, where the aggressor/perpetrator is admired, forgiven and worshiped. Japan are not on their own, EU seems to have a similar trend.

John Vu
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John Vu

Do they still reverse engineer?

Vince Dhimos
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Vince Dhimos

Let’s hope Japan is never attacked. These batteries will not be useful in the interception of the Kinzhal or the Sarmat. Or the Avangard.

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