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The Turkish Emerging Market Timebomb

Authored by Jim O’Neill, originally on Project Syndicate:


As the Turkish lira continues to depreciate against the dollar, fears of a classic emerging-market crisis have come to the fore. Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan’s populist economic policies have finally caught up to him, and sooner or later, he will have to make nice with his country’s traditional Western allies.

Turkey’s falling currency and deteriorating financial conditions lend credence, at least for some people, to the notion that “a crisis is a terrible thing to waste.” I suspect that many Western policymakers, in particular, are not entirely unhappy about Turkey’s plight.

To veteran economic observers, Turkey’s troubles are almost a textbook case of an emerging-market flop. It is August, after all, and back in the 1990s, one could barely go a single year without some kind of financial crisis striking in the dog days of summer.

But more to the point, Turkey has a large, persistent current-account deficit, and a belligerent leader who does not realize – or refuses to acknowledge – that his populist economic policies are unsustainable. Moreover, Turkey has become increasingly dependent on overseas investors (and probably some wealthy domestic investors, too).

Given these slowly gestating factors, markets have long assumed that Turkey was headed for a currency crisis. In fact, such worries were widespread as far back as the fall of 2013, when I was in Istanbul interviewing business and financial leaders for a BBC Radio series on emerging economies. At that time, markets were beginning to fear that monetary-policy normalization and an end to quantitative easing in the United States would have dire consequences globally. The Turkish lira has been flirting with disaster ever since.

Now that the crisis has finally come to pass, it is Turkey’s population that will bear the brunt of it. The country must drastically tighten its domestic monetary policy, curtail foreign borrowing, and prepare for the likelihood of a full-blown economic recession, during which time domestic saving will slowly have to be rebuilt.

Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan’s leadership will both complicate matters and give Turkey some leverage. Erdoğan has  constitutional powers, reducing those of the parliament, and undercutting the independence of monetary and fiscal policymaking. And to top it off, he seems to be reveling in an escalating feud with US President Donald Trump’s administration over Turkey’s imprisonment of an American pastor and purchase of a Russian S-400 missile-defense system.

This is a dangerous brew for the leader of an emerging economy to imbibe, particularly when the United States itself has embarked on a Ronald Reagan-style fiscal expansion that has pushed the US Federal Reserve to raise interest rates faster than it would have otherwise. Given the unlikelihood of some external source of funding emerging, Erdoğan will eventually have to back down on some of his unorthodox policies. My guess is that we’ll see a return to a more conventional monetary policy, and possibly a new fiscal-policy framework.

As for Turkey’s leverage in the current crisis, it is worth remembering that the country has a large and youthful population, and thus the potential to grow into a much larger economy in the future. It also enjoys a privileged geographic position at the crossroads of Europe, the Middle East, and Central Asia, which means that many major players have a stake in ensuring its stability. Indeed, many Europeans still hold out hope that Turkey will embrace Western-style capitalism, despite the damage that Erdoğan has done to the country’s European Union accession bid.

Among the regional powers, Russia is sometimes mentioned as a potential savior for Turkey. There is no doubt that Russian President Vladimir Putin would love to use Turkey’s crisis to pull it even further away from its NATO allies. But Erdoğan and his advisers would be deeply mistaken to think that Russia can fill Turkey’s financial void. A Kremlin intervention would do little for Turkey, and would likely exacerbate Russia’s own .

The other two potential patrons are Qatar and, of course, China. But while Qatar, one of Turkey’s closest Gulf allies, could provide financial aid, it does not ultimately have the wherewithal to pull Turkey out of its crisis singlehandedly.

As for China, though it will not want to waste the opportunity to increase its influence vis-à-vis Turkey, it is not the country’s style to step into such a volatile situation, much less assume responsibility for solving the problem. The more likely outcome – as we are seeing in Greece – is that China will unleash its companies to pursue investment opportunities after the dust settles.

That means that Turkey’s economic salvation lies with its conventional Western allies: the US and the EU (particularly France and Germany). On August 13, a White House spokesperson confirmed that the Trump administration is watching the financial-market response to Turkey’s crisis “very closely.” The last thing that Trump wants is a crumbling world economy and a massive dollar rally, which could derail his domestic economic ambitions. So a classic Trump “trade” is probably there for Erdoğan, if he is willing to come to the negotiating table.

Likewise, some of Europe’s biggest and most fragile banks have significant exposure to Turkey. Combine that with the ongoing political crisis over migration, and you have a recipe for deeper destabilization within the EU. I, for one, cannot imagine that European leaders will sit by and do nothing while Turkey implodes on their border.

Despite his escalating rhetoric, Erdoğan may soon find that he has little choice but to abandon his isolationist and antagonistic policies of the last few years. If he does, many investors may look back next year and wish that they had snapped up a few lira when they had the chance.

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VeeNarian (Yerevan)CheviHelga FellayAM HantsMarc Landreville Recent comment authors
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VeeNarian (Yerevan)
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VeeNarian (Yerevan)

This is a very limited and blinkered analysis. Listen to Erdogan: Turkey does have other partners. Then the US/EU/NATO gangsters will be well and truly stuffed.

Chevi
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Chevi

who the heck is this guy Jim ???????? the EU is bankrupt………usa is kaput………. end of story……..

Helga Fellay
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Helga Fellay

This author seems utterly clueless. Turkey has – finally – realized that its future lies with the new alliances that are gaining power as the old order, the western alliance, is going down fast. Quatar has already offered a bailout, and while the transition period is painful, Turkey will rise again, without the help of that sinking ship, the EU, which will go down alongside its master, the USA.

AM Hants
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AM Hants

Sorry, this is off topic, but, might be of interest.

BREAKING: Ukrainian Army & Blackwater Prepare Use Of Radiation Weapon On Donbass (DOCUMENTS, MAP)
Major development, Cyber-Berkut reveals all… https://www.fort-russ.com/2018/08/breaking-ukrainian-army-blackwater-prepare-use-of-radiation-weapon-on-donbass-documents-map/

Wonder if they will time it, to kick off the mid-term elections, whilst blaming Russia?

Remember, the Blackwater mercenaries, who are now run by Monsanto, back in February 2014, over in Ukraine? Isn’t Eric Prince’s sister, the Education secretary, over in the US? So why is he heavily involved with Soros funded organisations, or does brother Eric, just follow the money, no matter who pays the bills?

Marc Landreville
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Marc Landreville

The US thinks that it can influence Turkey’s future economic development. What they have trouble realising is that the US economic dominance is waning. Turkey may switch to China/BRICS rapidly developing economic infrastructure. The US thinks that Turkey is tied and committed to NATO and will eventually cede to US demands. However, under previous governments, Turkey wanted to become part of Europe, and many decades ago, the EU told Turkey that joining NATO was the first step. In the last decade, it has become clear to Turkey that Europe doesn’t want them. Therefore, there is little benefit for Turkey to… Read more »

John R Balch Jr
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John R Balch Jr

It seems the United States wants to be the only “Super Power” in the world and now “Outer Space” so they can tell other countries who they can trade with and who they can not trade with and what they can trade and what they can not trade. They even have a White House Adviser who wants to kick China out of the World Trade Organization because China won’t bow down to the United States will on trade. The United States are now trying to become like the former Roman Empire, the former Ottoman Empire or the former British Empire,… Read more »

Poovizhi arasan
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Poovizhi arasan

You seem to have forgotten history, in writing this essay, Mr Zuesse . On August 15, 1971, US defaulted on its international obligations, making it the first sovereign default post war in post WW II history. So defaulting on its international obligations is potential answer. But it could damage credibility. Credible alternatives, would be to abrogate the Incrilik treaty arrangements, and insist that rentals on the base be made in Gold or Euros or any other non dollar currencies. Since Yuan comprises at least 10 per cent of the trade basket, it could also be an alternative ! Simultaneously hike… Read more »

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