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Russian Government Condemn’s European Parliament’s Blaming Stalin as Having Started WW II

Submitted by Eric Zuesse…

On October 1st, Russia’s Tass news agency reported that the Director of the Russian Foreign Intelligence Service Sergei Naryshkin condemned the European Parliament for having blamed Stalin along with Hitler as having started World War II. He said, “The recent resolution adopted by the European Parliament that assigned the historic blame for the outbreak of the Second World War on the Soviet Union is nothing but a product of the cynical, immoral and even sleazy political put-up job.”

Naryshkin was referring to the September 19th vote in the European Parliament, by 535 votes in favor, 66 against and 52 abstentions, approving a document which stated that “The European Parliament … Stresses that the Second World War, the most devastating war in Europe’s history, was started as an immediate result of the notorious Nazi-Soviet Treaty on Non-Aggression of 23 August 1939, also known as the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact, and its secret protocols, whereby two totalitarian regimes that shared the goal of world conquest divided Europe into two zones of influence.”

The historical reality of the matter is as follows, as I reported in fuller historical context on October 1st:

On 18 October 2008, Britain’s Telegraph bannered “Stalin ‘planned to send a million troops to stop Hitler if Britain and France agreed pact’” and buried the core revelation, that Stalin prior to the Ribbentrop-Molotov Pact recognized Hitler’s determination to conquer the Soviet Union and he had, on 15 August 1939, urged Neville Chamberlain to accept the U.S.S.R. as an ally in their mutual war to defeat Hitler; but Chamberlain refused, and so Stalin reached out to Hitler for an agreement with him to a dividing-line between those two countries’ (Germany’s and U.S.S.R.’s) essential areas of control for each one’s national security. Poland especially was a worry to both of them, because Poland had had territorial conflicts with both Germany and the Soviet Union. Thus was signed on 23 August 1939 the Ribbentrop-Molotov Pact, which split Poland between both countries.

The Versalles Treaty at the end of WW I had handed to Poland what had been German territory that through most of prior history had been Polish territory. Hitler was elected into power in 1933 vowing to abandon that Treaty and to restore, to German rule, that part of Poland.

As regards Poland’s conflicts with Russia: Poland had invaded Moscow during 1605-18, before Russia responded by both military and diplomatic means to virtually conquer Poland into becoming a colony of Russia, which it remained almost uninterruptedly until 1939, when the Hitler-Stalin agreement — the Ribbentrop-Molotov Pact — restored part of Poland to the Soviet Union, but handed the other part of Poland to Germany.

Stalin, having been spurned by Chamberlain (who held his own imperialistic intentions — he was as imperialistic as were the fascists: Hitler, Hirohito, and Mussolini), had actually no other option in 1939 than to reach a peace-agreement with Hitler, so as to avoid having the Soviet Union become swallowed up by the capitalist countries — first by Germany, and then by whatever countries would finally win the coming World War (presumably, likewise Germany).

Consequently, the European Parliament voted on September 19th, by 535 to 66, for a lie, that the blame for the war in Europe was shared equally between both Stalin and Hitler, when, in fact, Stalin had tried to ally with Chamberlain in order to go to war together against Hitler, which would have — if Chamberlain had said yes — promptly been announced and could thereby have prevented, or at least postponed, Hitler’s invasion. If Chamberlain had said yes, then, of course, there wouldn’t have been any joint invasion of Poland by both Germany and the Soviet Union, but, to the contrary, there would have been, instead, a joint warning by both the British empire and the Soviet Union saying that if Hitler invaded any country, it would start a war by the allies — England and the Soviet Union — against Nazi Germany. The invasion of Poland might even have been prevented.

The European Union’s September 19th Resolution also condemned today’s Russia, in the following ways:

“Whereas although the crimes of the Nazi regime were evaluated and punished by means of the Nuremberg trials, there is still an urgent need to raise awareness, carry out moral assessments and conduct legal inquiries into the crimes of Stalinism and other dictatorships”

“Whereas despite the fact that on 24 December 1989 the Congress of People’s Deputies of the USSR condemned the signing of the Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact, in addition to other agreements made with Nazi Germany, the Russian authorities denied responsibility for this agreement and its consequences in August 2019 and are currently promoting the view that Poland, the Baltic States and the West are the true instigators of WWII”

“Calls on all Member States to commemorate 23 August as the European Day of Remembrance for the victims of totalitarian regimes at both EU and national level, and to raise the younger generation’s awareness of these issues by including the history and analysis of the consequences of totalitarian regimes in the curricula and textbooks of all schools in the EU”

“Points out that in the light of their accession to the EU and NATO, the countries of Eastern and Central European have not only returned to the European family of free democratic countries, but also demonstrated success, with the EU’s assistance”

“Expresses concern at the continued use of symbols of totalitarian regimes in the public sphere and for commercial purposes, and recalls that a number of European countries have banned the use of both Nazi and communist symbols”

“Maintains that Russia remains the greatest victim of communist totalitarianism and that its development into a democratic state will be impeded as long as the government, the political elite and political propaganda continue to whitewash communist crimes and glorify the Soviet totalitarian regime; calls, therefore, on Russian society to come to terms with its tragic past.”

The presumption there is that today’s Russia has not condemned Stalin and his crimes against the Soviet peoples, as well as the invasion of Poland, and that today’s Russia is totalitarian instead of a democracy (at least as much of a democracy as the EU itself is). It’s a call for — if not outright war against Russia — it’s a call for worsening relations between Russia and the rest of Europe. How contemptible.

As my article on October 1st documented: without the Soviet Union’s help, Hitler would probably have won WW II. Some thanks it is that today’s Russians (the nation that suffered the largest number of casualties and other losses from Hitler’s invasion of it) receive from the EU nations that they had saved from being controlled today by the Nazis. How contemptible can the EU possibly be, by 535 votes in favor, 66 against?

I ask this question as an American historian who enormously admires our President Franklin Delano Roosevelt’s decisions throughout the war (except for the internments of Japanese-Americans). I think that he would despise what the EU has become. I certainly do. I share the contempt of today’s EU that was expressed by Mr. Naryshkin.

 


Investigative historian Eric Zuesse is the author, most recently, of They’re Not Even Close: The Democratic vs. Republican Economic Records, 1910-2010, and of CHRIST’S VENTRILOQUISTS: The Event that Created Christianity.

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Troxy Smith
Troxy Smith
October 2, 2019

This article is rubbish. Stalin’s intention wasn’t to have “peace”, his intention was a land grab pure and simple; hence USSR imperialism vs sovereign nation states like Finland. The author should be ashamed of himself.

History's Rhythms and Rhymes
History's Rhythms and Rhymes
Reply to  Troxy Smith
October 2, 2019

By creating a buffer between the USSR and an antagonistic Nazi Germany? I may be thoroughly antagonistic toward Stalin and his USSR myself but it certainly seems like it was a rational decision on his part at the time.

Just at it was a rational decision by Russia today to repatriate an autonomous, russophilial Crimea by its own pleading, after an antagonistic, expansionist NATO telegraphed its intentions by coup d’etat, to claim it for its own and turn the Black Sea into an exclusively NATO lake.

Now go stand in the corner, you silly sot.

Dumbarse Dubya
Dumbarse Dubya
Reply to  History's Rhythms and Rhymes
October 3, 2019

You mean my intentions to bring Georgia and Ukraine into NATO were designed to turn the Black Sea into a NATO lake? I had no idea. My pal Cheney never told me. What else did he keep from me? Not mea culpa. I swear. Now please excuse me, I have more portraits to paint by number.

US motto: thugs always come in handy
US motto: thugs always come in handy
Reply to  History's Rhythms and Rhymes
October 3, 2019

I’m sure NATO realized that it would have had to repress with extreme prejudice the bulk of the Crimean population had it done that, and of course had expected to rely on Parubiy’s skinhead storm troopers to do the job. It couldn’t have been that clueless to not have understood that. Could it?

Troxy Smith
Troxy Smith
Reply to  History's Rhythms and Rhymes
October 3, 2019

I’m noticing that the Duran has been hijacked by authors who are Bolshevik and Stalinist apologists.
I’m not trying to defend Western imperialism, but you all seem to give Bolshevik imperialism, exploitation, and theft a free pass.
It’s nice that you regard smaller states as “a buffer”…

To Proxy Troxy
To Proxy Troxy
Reply to  Troxy Smith
October 3, 2019

I give no credence to ignoramuses, nuts and fruitcakes. Therefore, begone – post haste.

Olivia Kroth
Reply to  Troxy Smith
October 4, 2019

Joseph Stalin was a great Soviet leader. He saved the Soviet Union and all of Russsia from Nazi fascism. Eternal glory!

Olivia Kroth
Reply to  Olivia Kroth
October 6, 2019

Joseph Stalin was the great leader who raised Russian civilization to the very top! His enemies are afraid of him even today, decades after his death.

Olivia Kroth
Reply to  Eric Zuesse
October 4, 2019

Thank you for this very differentiated explanation and your great article, Eric. Excellent, as always.

Eric Zuesse Stalinist
Eric Zuesse Stalinist
Reply to  Eric Zuesse
October 4, 2019

I’m Eric Zuesse, and I believe Stalin wasn’t an imperalist, because he didn’t like Trotsky. I ignore the fact that the Bolsheviks killed off dissent and their fellow revolutionaries who thought differently. I ignore the fact that the party leader became the messiah, the party book the bible, the communist ideology the new religion, the communist party the new church. I ignore all the imperialism and colonization and population displacement committed under Stalin, and all the gulags, forced collectivization, and artificially-created famines, and population control schemes. I’m also a fool who believes that FDR was a dove, when all facts… Read more »

Olivia Kroth
Reply to  Eric Zuesse Stalinist
October 4, 2019

Who is stealing Eric Zuesse’s identity? A CIA troll?

Olivia Kroth
Reply to  Eric Zuesse
October 5, 2019

Indeed, trolls and impostors are despicable, Eric. Please do not get discouraged by opposing comments. They show that you have touched a rough spot in recent world history. Your texts are excellent, thank you.

Benton Avery
Benton Avery
October 2, 2019

FDR’s desire to protect British Colonies, expressed in a letter to Nazi Germany.
FDR hypocritically referred to these British Colonies as “independent nations.”
The subtitles fail to capture the last enumerated country Iran.
https://youtu.be/FtDxjVCu56E?t=48

Haffa Rhouni
Haffa Rhouni
Reply to  Eric Zuesse
October 4, 2019

In that speech, Hitler cited FDR’s words. That list of so called independent nations was FDR’s.
You’re either historically illiterate, or you’re a propaganda agent.

Bobby Valdz
Bobby Valdz
Reply to  Eric Zuesse
October 4, 2019

“FDR privately expressed to Churchill strong disagreement about any continuation of the British empire after the war would be won.”
Yes, because the Yanks were agreed to take over.

Regula
Regula
October 2, 2019

The EU trying hard to push off its responsibility for the Nazi war on Stalin. And how do they account for the fact that Hitler invaded Russia, not the other way round? But the real reason is of course to stay aligned with the US against Russia and a priori justify and whitewash a future war of NATO against Russia. Merkel is terrified that Trump could impose a 25% tariff on German vehicle export to the US and to avoid that caves in to the most unreasonable demands made by the US. Merkel makes Chamberlain look like a courageous, decided… Read more »

History on Parade
History on Parade
Reply to  Regula
October 2, 2019

When Poland moved to exploit Chamberlain’s acceptance of Czechoslovakia’s dismemberment by grabbing a piece of it for itself, it set the stage for things to come. It certainly could not have considered such a strategically useless annexation as a preemptive move against German ambitions, so – there you have it.

So, you see – it was by the EU’s own logic, Poland that started WWII. Its own subsequent dismemberment may have simply been ironic justice for its own greed.

I don't buy it
I don't buy it
Reply to  History on Parade
October 3, 2019

Quote: “It certainly could not have considered such a strategically useless annexation as a preemptive move against German ambitions, so – there you have it.”

Why not? It could have been another one of those Polish brainstorms. You know, like 3 Poles to change a light bulb, one to hold it and two to spin the ladder. Or that other one about how many pilots it takes to land the Polish army in Smolensk.

Putin promised us Lwow, honest.
Putin promised us Lwow, honest.
Reply to  I don't buy it
October 3, 2019

Oh, I heard that one. Two pilots to lower the landing gear and a third one stumbling into the cockpit singing the ‘100 bottles of beer song’ and ordering them to: “Never mind those birch branches ahead. The plane is bigger than all of them.”

EU's Fractured Fairytales
EU's Fractured Fairytales
October 2, 2019

Quote: “……..when, in fact, Stalin had tried to ally with Chamberlin in order to go to war together against Hitler.”

Well, there you have it. There’s the proof that Stalin started the war and Hitler had no choice but to react in self-defense. 😉

Besides, even the US has called a preemptive war (or coup d’etat as the case may be) a legitimate and necessary means of self defense so once again, as in Ukraine today, Hitler and America are on the same side of history.

Olivia Kroth
October 3, 2019

The great Joseph Stalin is being demonized in the West, because they are jealous of him.

Troxy Smith
Troxy Smith
Reply to  Olivia Kroth
October 3, 2019

The “great” Stalin?
West isn’t jealous of Stalin. The West didn’t need a totalitarian like Stalin in order to rob and kill people; they marketed better under the labels of democracy, civilization, and free markets.
The USSR would have collapsed before Germany, if not for the climate and for the massive amounts of materials and war goods the USA and the UK sent to the USSR. Go crawl into a hole, you Bolshevik witch.

Olivia Kroth
Reply to  Eric Zuesse
October 4, 2019

Sorry to contradict you in this point, Eric, but in Russia many people venerate the great leader Stalin. Busts and statues are being erected for him. The Moscow Times reported recently that Stalin’s popularity is at a high in the Russian Federation. People know what they owe him.

Also I believe that Stalin was a follower of Lenin rather than Marx.

Olivia Kroth
Reply to  Eric Zuesse
October 5, 2019

Yes, of course, Eric. Lenin quoted Marx a lot, and Stalin quoted Lenin. This is the chain of thought they used in their ideology. I am reading two interesting German websites about these topics where they have a lot of history of the Soviet Union. Both authors/bloggers live in the former DDR, where Putin was stationed as KGB officer at the beginning of his career. They are very familiar with the thoughts of Marx, Lenin and Stalin.

Vera Gottlieb
Vera Gottlieb
October 4, 2019

After so many years gone by…does it really matter? Doesn’t humanity have more pressing problems to take care of?

Olivia Kroth
Reply to  Vera Gottlieb
October 5, 2019

Yes, Vera, it matters. Those who do not know history are bound to repeat the same mistakes forever. Eric Zuesse is setting the record straight about World War II and Soviet involvement in it. I find this a very important topic, especially since the EU and USA are falsifying facts on purpose. We must oppose their vile endeavour with all our forces …

Olivia Kroth
October 4, 2019

https://www.themoscowtimes.com/2019/10/04/putin-says-its-cynical-to-blame-stalin-for-world-war-ii-a67605

Putin Says It’s ‘Cynical’ to Blame Stalin for World War II
The president highlighted the Soviet Union’s role in defeating the Nazis.

“To say that Stalin unleashed the war is the height of cynicism,” Putin said at an international conference in southern Russia on Thursday.

“It’s as if the Soviet Union attacked Germany at 4 a.m. on June 22 [1941] and not vice versa,” he told the Valdai Discussion Club.

Olivia Kroth
Reply to  Olivia Kroth
October 4, 2019

September 1939: the Myth of Soviet Aggression

Schiff And NYT Do Damage Control Over Sneak Peek At CIA Whistleblower Complaint; Trump Says Schiff Wrote It