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Angela Merkel hopes to stay in power until 2021. She will be out much sooner (Video)

Angela Merkel hopes to stay in power until 2021. She will be out much sooner (Video)

Now that the most stable neo-liberal, globalist, German Chancellor Angela Merkel, has announced her future retirement from politics, alarm is sweeping throughout the Deep State and its media establishment.

Chancellor Angela Merkel said that she needs to write “a new chapter” in German politics, the one with her name on it is done.

Whether Merkel can stay on as Chancellor for three more years depends on whether anyone in her CDU party, or in any German party, can measure up to her and make a convincing leadership claim before her tenure is up in 2021.

Merkel has served as Chancellor for thirteen years. She will step down as the leader of  the Christian Democratic Union (CDU), in early December at its next conference, in Hamburg…however she plans to stay on as German Chancellor until the next elections in 2021. More likely than not, Merkel will be pushed out much sooner than here 2021 deadline.

According to The New Yorker, what is even more alarming is that the German results are hardly an isolated phenomenon. Merkel made her announcement the day after Jair Bolsonaro won the Presidency in Brazil and a day before President Donald Trump announced that he thought he could end birthright citizenship in the United States despite the clear words of the Constitution stating otherwise. From Viktor Orbán, in Hungary, to Rodrigo Duterte, in the Philippines, there is a clear theme emerging: love the big man, fear the stranger.

Germany doesn’t have such a figure yet—not this time around. (Nor does Britain, though it has Boris Johnson, whose farce is getting uglier, and Brexit.) It has had Merkel, who urged Germans to believe, with regard to the large-scale arrival of refugees, that “we can handle it,” a position that her party has forced her to partially retreat from. Since last year’s parliamentary elections, she has held her position thanks only to an unstable “Grand Coalition” with the S.P.D.—the Große Koalition, known in shorthand as the GroKo—which might not hold together for long. She is burdened by the rise of extremism, by domestic discontent related to her welcoming of refugees, and by the weight of her long tenure—she has been in office longer than Franklin D. Roosevelt, the longest-serving American President, was at the time of his death. A person doesn’t hold power for that long in a competitive political system without having an instinct for it. That is particularly true of someone like Merkel, who came from a marginal part of the country—the former East Germany—and only entered politics after a career as a scientist, seizing the moment, after reunification, when so much was up for grabs. And Merkel’s instincts apparently told her that if she wanted to control her exit, she had to make her move now.

The Duran’s Alex Christoforou and Editor-in-Chief Alexander Mercouris discuss Merkel’s stunning, but expected announcement, and what this means for Germany, Europe, the United States and Russia.

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Via RT

Angela Merkel has said she will not seek re-election as Germany’s chancellor as well as CDU’s party chair. The decision comes after a debacle for her ruling party in the local elections in the federal state of Hesse.

On Sunday, Merkel’s Christian Democratic Union (CDU) received 28 percent of the votes. Although that was more support than other competitors received, it was a significant drop from the 38.3 percent won by the party in the state’s last election in 2013.

However, Merkel claimed that her decision not to run for party chair again was made before the plebiscite and even before German parliament’s summer recess. Party chair aside, the top politician also would not be available for another term as a chancellor.

This fourth term is my last as German chancellor. At the federal election in 2021, I will not stand again as chancellor candidate, nor as a candidate for the Bundestag, and…I won’t seek any further political offices.

What’s more, if snap elections need to take place before 2021, Merkel would not run for the top post either.

She also stated that the government has “lost credibility.” 

A decision not to head for re-election as chief of the CDU and to not ditch the chancellorship “looks like a plan” that has been carefully devised, German lawyer Maximilian Krah told RT.

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Merkel’s favored person to take over as party boss is Annegret Kramp-Karrenbauer. If she gets in, Merkel will “have a clone of herself as a party leader so she can remain in the chancellor’s office… she could stay in power for the next five or six years!”

However, if a Merkel critic takes center stage as party leader, there will be a different outcome. But even if that were the case, the CDU is unlikely to publicly turn on its current leader, as it is “very submissive” towards the chancellor.

“It would give a development against Merkel, but not a revolution. The CDU is not a party that makes revolutions. In no way.”

As the CDU experiences losses in support, the right-wing Alternative for Germany (AfD) party is seeing a rise in popularity. It received 12 percent of the votes in Hesse on Sunday, and now holds parliamentary seats in every single German state.

Speaking to RT following the Hesse elections, independent political observer Steven Meissner said that Merkel “is getting weaker and weaker and more unpopular.” That brings her team more problems than benefits, he alleged.

Merkel’s popularity has indeed been slipping for a long time, with her handling of the 2015 migrant crisis being a major contributing factor. A July poll found that only one in five Germans were happy with her performance as leader.

Dr. Werner Patzelt, a political science professor at the Technical University of Dresden, thinks that the chancellor’s handling of migration issue is mostly to blame for her party’s reduced support.

“The core problem of the CDU is the migration politics conducted by Chancellor Merkel. For many years now, German voters have revolted against these politics and they voted for the AfD and defected from the CDU…” In fact, AfD has filled a representation gap that was left when the CDU began shifting towards the center-left.

Merkel, 64, chaired the CDU party since 2000 and has served as Germany’s chancellor since 2005.

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a.f.Vivian TzamisOlivia KrothTEPJPH Recent comment authors
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JPH
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JPH

Exactly. Merkel as both Kanzler and Party Chair exercised near absolute control. Anyone not fully aligned suffered consequences (shunning is still very effective). This near compulsory support was demonstrated by the quite unbelievable support she seemed to enjoy at her most recent reelection as party chair. Clearly most didn’t want to risk her wrath. Such political system tends to simulate stability, but changes then come sudden, fast and unexpected once the dam has been broken actually revealing the opposition which was forced into hiding. Previous changes for the Kanzler job may serve to illustrate that aspect of Germany’s political culture.… Read more »

Olivia Kroth, author and journalist
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There is no “German political cuture”, it is US political culture, translated into the German language. That is all there is to it.

TEP
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TEP

A lot of things can happen between now and 2021. As you say, Merkel is 64 which is relatively young in leadership politics. This could even be an establishment plan – let the German people replace her as per their demands, and then make things much worse for them … by 2021 they will be begging for Merkel to return to the Bundestag. It’s a similar philosophy to Brexit – when the people step out of line and vote the “wrong” way, make things so bad that they soon flock back to the safe pastures of the establishment.

Olivia Kroth, author and journalist
Member

Whether she stays or not does not really matter. Whoever will be replacing her will do exactly the same, follow the “advice” given by Washington, Pentagon, the CIA. Germany is a “lost case”.

Vivian Tzamis
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Vivian Tzamis

This is all theatre
To pacify the masses
Suddenly leaders are being replaced by populists
Merkel will be going so you can feel safe again
All BS….the Rothschilds are still in power whoever the front-guy is
Until Putin makes a move and finally shuts down the Russian Israel Mafia and dis-arms Israel… the show will go on

a.f.
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a.f.

Germany stands for the extension of sanctions against Russia, since the Minsk agreements are not implemented. German Chancellor Angela Merkel said this at a joint press conference with President of Ukraine Petro Poroshenko at the Mariinsky Palace in Kyiv, an Ukrinform correspondent reported. “Unfortunately, the Minsk agreements are not respected. If something happens, it is a millimeter forward, and from time to time it is a step backward. Therefore, Germany will stand for the continuation of sanctions,” the chancellor said. As reported, on Thursday, November 1, Federal Chancellor Angela Merkel is on a working visit to Ukraine. During the visit,… Read more »

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