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246 Greek University Economic Professors sign declaration to urge Greeks to vote YES in referendum

Declaration of Professors of Economics at Greek Universities on the referendum as to whether Greece should accept the final proposal delivered by EU/Troika creditors.

Alex Christoforou

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The following declaration is signed by 246 professors at Economics Schools and Universities in Greece. By this declaration, we want to express our great distress about the latest developments in our country. We strongly believe that, at this crucial point, it is of paramount importance to avoid excesses, to show national cohesion, to preserve our position in the Eurozone and the EU, and to regain our credibility in the international community. Further, the fiscal consolidation program, drawn jointly with our EU partners and other creditors like the IMF, should be characterized by the lowest possible recessionary consequences and the highest possible level of social protection, aiming at growth and job creation in the private sector as soon as possible. The prolonged political uncertainty has led the economy to a renewed recession, has reversed the decline in unemployment, has lowered tax revenue and has widened the fiscal gap.

Taking into account that the proposals of our creditors and the Greek government were converging until last Friday, we believe that what is really at stake in the coming Referendum, irrespective of the precise formulation of the question, is whether Greece will remain, or not, in the Eurozone and, possibly, whether it will remain in the EU itself.

The funding of the Greek economy by Eurozone countries was suspended last weekend after the Greek government abandoned the negotiations at a time when no alternative funding opportunities seem to be available. We are already at the first stage of a very slippery process that, if not urgently reversed, will lead to a chaotic debt default and exit from the Eurozone. Bank closures and capital controls (that had been so far avoided throughout the deep crisis) constitute only the first rupture from the Eurozone and the EU itself

We believe that the recessionary consequences of debt default and exit from the Eurozone, especially in such a chaotic and superficial way, will be much worse than the effects of a painful compromise with our EU partners and the IMF. A disorderly break of our country from the core of Europe will have disastrous economic, social, political and geopolitical consequences.

Short-run consequences: Bank closures, cut in the value of deposits, sharp decline in tourism, shortages of basic consumer goods and raw materials, black market, hyperinflation, firm bankruptcies and a big rise in unemployment, rapid fall in real wages and the real value of pensions, deep recession and serious problems in the functioning of public health care and defense, social unrest.

Medium-term consequences: international isolation of the country, no access to international capital markets for several years, low growth and anemic investment, high unemployment combined with high inflation rates, suspension of the flow of EU structural funds, significant decline in the standard of living, poor provision of basic public goods and services.

All these developments should not have happened after 5 years of big sacrifices by the Greek people, and a tremendous fiscal adjustment, right at the time when the economy was starting to recover, with favourable expectations for further easing in the terms of our public debt obligations. They should not have happened in a period when the European economy is returning to positive growth rates and other peripheral euro countries start growing and reducing unemployment. They should not have happened in a favorable time for further EU integration that will benefit the South and when the ECB facilitates growth with excess liquidity and zero interest rates.

Leaving the Eurozone, especially with this chaotic and superficial way, would likely lead to a process of leaving the EU too, with unpredictable and disastrous consequences for the national security and the democratic stability of our country.

For all these reasons, Greece must remain in the core of the EU, which is the Eurozone.

For all these reasons, our unequivocal answer to the real question of the referendum is: YES. Yes, to Europe.

1. Adam Αntonis University of Ioannina

2. Aggelidis Timotheos University of Peloponnese

3. Alexakis Christos University of Pireaus

4. Alexakis Panagiotis Athens University

5. Anagnostou Aggeliki University of Thessaly

6. Andoniou Fabio University of Ioannina

7. Andronikidis Αndreas University of Macedonia

8. Androutsopoulos Ion Athens University of Economics and Business

9. Androutsopoulos Κonstantinos Athens University of Economics and Business

10. Apergis Νikolaos University of Pireaus

11. Apostolopoulos Thodoros Athens University of Economics and Business

12. Argouslidis Paris Athens University of Economics and Business

13. Arvanitis Stelios Athens University of Economics and Business

14. Atsalakis George Polytechnic of Crete

15. Avlonitis George Athens University of Economics and Business

16. Balios Dimitris Athens University

17. Ballas Apostolos Athens University of Economics and Business

18. Baltas Georgios Athens University of Economics and Business

19. Baltas Nikolaos Athens University of Economics and Business

20. Basiakos Ioannis Athens University

21. Bellou Victoria University of Thessaly

22. Benos Nikos University of Ioannina

23. Benos Theofanis University of Pireaus

24. Billias Ioannis Athens University of Economics and Business

25. Bitros Georgios Athens University of Economics and Business

26. Blavoukos Spyros Athens University of Economics and Business

27. Bourantas Dimitris Athens University of Economics and Business

28. Bourantonis Dimitris Athens University of Economics and Business

29. Bournova Eugenia Athens University

30. Brisimis Sofoklis University of Pireaus

31. Chalamandaris George Athens University of Economics and Business

32. Chalkias Ioannis Athens University of Economics and Business

33. Charitakis Nikos Athens University

34. Chletsos Michael University of Ioannina

35. Chlomoudis Kostas University of Pireaus

36. Chortareas George Athens University

37. Chouliaras Asteris University of Peloponnese

38. Christopoulos Dimitris Panteion University

39. Christopoulou Sofia University of Macedonia

40. Christou George Athens University of Economics and Business

41. Damianos Dimitris Agricultural University of Athens

42. Dedoulis Manolis Athens University of Economics and Business

43. Delipalla Sofia University of Macedonia

44. Demoirakos Efthymios Athens University of Economics and Business

45. Demos Antonis Athens University of Economics and Business

46. Demousis Michalis University of Patras

47. Dialla Violetta Athens University

48. Dimeli Sofia Athens University of Economics and Business

49. Dimitriadi Zoi University of Macedonia

50. Dotsis Georgios Athens University

51. Doukidis Georgios Athens University of Economics and Business

52. Drakos Anastasios Athens University of Economics and Business

53. Economides George Athens University of Economics and Business

54. Economidou Claire University of Pireaus

55. Economou Athina University of Thessaly

56. Efstratoglou Sofia Agricultural University of Athens

57. Eleftheriou Kostas University of Pireaus

58. Fountas Stylianos University of Macedonia

59. Gaganis Chrysovalantis Univiversity of Crete

60. Gatsios Konstantinos Athens University of Economics and Business

61. Genakos Christos Athens University of Economics and Business

62. Genius Margarita University of Crete

63. Georgiou Andreas University of Macedonia

64. Georgoutsos Dimitrios Athens University of Economics and Business

65. Giaglis Georgios Athens University of Economics and Business

66. Giamouridis Daniel Athens University of Economics and Business

67. Giannakopoulos Nikos University of Patras

68. Giannelis Dimitrios University of Pireaus

69. Giannelis Νikos University of Crete

70. Giotopoulos Ioannis University of Peloponnese

71. Glavinis Panayotis Aristotle University of Thessaloniki

72. Griva Krina University of Ioannina

73. Hassid Josef University of Pireaus

74. Hatziantoniou Damianos Athens University of Economics and Business

75. Hatzipanayotou Panos Athens University of Economics and Business

76. Hatzis Aristides Athens University

77. Iatridis George University of Thessaly

78. Ifantopoulos Ioannis Athens University

79. Indounas Konstantinos Athens University of Economics and Business

80. Ioannidis Antonis Athens University of Economics and Business

81. Ioannidis Stavros Panteion University

82. Ioannou Georgios Athens University of Economics and Business

83. Iordanoglou Chrysafis Panteion University

84. Ireiotis Nikolaos Athens University

85. Kainourgios Dimitris Athens University

86. Kalamboukis Theodoros Athens University of Economics and Business

87. Kalogirou Ioannis Metsovio Polytechnic University

88. Kalyvitis Sarantis Athens University of Economics and Business

89. Kammas Pantelis University of Ioannina

90. Karagiannis Ioannis University of Macedonia

91. Karamanis Konstantinos Athens University of Economics and Business

92. Karaveli Eleni Athens University of Economics and Business

93. Karkalakos Sotiris University of Pireaus

94. Kasimatis Konstantinos Athens University of Economics and Business

95. Katranidis Stelios University of Macedonia

96. Katsimi Margarita Athens University of Economics and Business

97. Kavousanos Emmanouil Athens University of Economics and Business

98. Kazakos Panos Athens University

99. Koen Sandra Athens University of Economics and Business

100. Kollias Christos University of Thessaly

101. Konstantinou Panagiotis Athens University of Economics and Business

102. Konstantopoulos Panos Athens University of Economics and Business

103. Kontouli Maria University of Peloponnese

104. Korliras Panagiotis Athens University of Economics and Business

105. Kosteletou Nikolina Athens University

106. Kostis Kostas Athens University

107. Kotsios Stelios Athens University

108. Kottaridi Konstantina University of Pireaus

109. Koundouri Phoebe Athens University of Economics and Business

110. Kouretas Georgios Athens University of Economics and Business

111. Kritikos Manolis Athens University of Economics and Business

112. Kyriazidou Katerina Athens University of Economics and Business

113. Kyriazis Nikolaos University of Thessaly

114. Kyriazis Dimitris University of Pireaus

115. Kyritsis Ioannis Aristotle University of Thessaloniki

116. Kyrkillis Dimitris University of Macedonia

117. Ladi Stella Panteion University

118. Lekakos Georgios Athens University of Economics and Business

119. Leledakis Georgios Athens University of Economics and Business

120. Leventakis Ioannis Athens University of Economics and Business

121. Liargovas Panagiotis University of Peloponnese

122. Liaropoulos Lykourgos Athens University

123. Loizidis Ioannis Athens University of Economics and Business

124. Lolos Sarantis Panteion University

125. Louri Eleni Athens University of Economics and Business

126. Louridas Pangiotis Athens University of Economics and Business

127. Malevris Nikos Athens University of Economics and Business

128. Malliaris Petros University of Pireaus

129. Matsagganis Manos Athens University of Economics and Business

130. Mergos Giorgos University of Athens

131. Metaxas Theodoros University of Thessaly

132. Miaouli Natasha Athens University of Economics and Business

133. Milliou Chrisovalantou Athens University of Economics and Business

134. Mylonas Nikolaos Athens University

135. Mylonidis Nikos University of Ioannina

136. Nikas Christos University of Macedonia

137. Nikolaou Ioannis Athens University of Economics and Business

138. Nikoleris Theodoros Athens University

139. Nikolopoulos Andreas Athens University of Economics and Business

140. Nikolotsa Daphni University of Crete

141. O’Donnel Owen University of Macedonia

142. Pagkratis Spiros Athens University of Economics and Business

143. Pagoulatos Giorgos Athens University of Economics and Business

144. Palis Thanos Aegean University

145. Palivos Theodoros Athens University of Economics and Business

146. Panagiotopoulou Lida Athens University of Economics and Business

147. Panagiotou Dimitris University of Ioannina

148. Panagopoulos Andreas University of Crete

149. Pantelides Theologos University of Macedonia

150. Papachristou Giorgos Aristotle University of Thessaloniki

151. Papadakis Vassilios Athens University of Economics and Business

152. Papadamou Stephanos University of Thessaly

153. Papadimitriou Stratos University of Pireaus

154. Papadopoulos Hrisoleon Aristotle University of Thessaloniki

155. Papadopoulos Konstantinos Aristotle University of Thessaloniki

156. Papalexandri Nancy Athens University of Economics and Business

157. Papanastasopoulos Giorgos University of Pireaus

158. Papandreou Andreas Athens University

159. Papapanagos Harris University of Macedonia

160. Papastathopoulou Polina Athens University of Economics and Business

161. Papathanassiou Iason University of Macedonia

162. Papavasiliou Nikolaos Athens University of Economics and Business

163. Papoulias Dimitris Athens University

164. Paraskevopoulos Christos University of Macedonia

165. Pasiouras Photis Polytechnic of Crete

166. Patronis Vassilios University of Patras

167. Patsouratis Vassilis Athens University of Economics and Business

168. Pechlivanos Lampros Athens University of Economics and Business

169. Peka Oikonomou University of Pireaus

170. Pelagides Thodoris University of Pireaus

171. Petrakis Manolis University of Crete

172. Petridou Evgenia Aristotle University of Thessaloniki

173. Philippopoulos Apostolis Athens University of Economics and Business

174. Pittis Nikitas University of Pireaus

175. Polemis Michalis University of Pireaus

176. Pollalis Ioannis University of Pireaus

177. Pournarakis Efthimios Athens University of Economics and Business

178. Pragidis Ioannis Democritus University of Thrace

179. Pramatari Katerina Athens University of Economics and Business

180. Psaltopoulos Dimitris University of Patras

181. Psarianos Jacob University of Thessaly

182. Psillaki Maria University of Pireaus

183. Raikou Katerina University of Pireaus

184. Repas Panagiotis Panteion University

185. Repoussis Panagiotis Athens University of Economics and Business

186. Riginos Michalis Athens University

187. Rigopoulou Eirini Athens University of Economics and Business

188. Roumanias Kostas Athens University of Economics and Business

189. Sakellaris Ploutarxos Athens University of Economics and Business

190. Sakellis Yiannis Panteion University

191. Samitas Aristides Aegean University

192. Sarris Alexandros Athens University

193. Sartzetakis Efthimios University of Macedonia

194. Sideropoulos Moissis Aristotle University of Thessaloniki

195. Siourounis Grigoris Panteion University

196. Siris Vasilios Athens University of Economics and Business

197. Sklavou Helen Athens University of Economics and Business

198. Sklias Pantelis University of Peloponnese

199. Skordile Sofia Harokopio University

200. Skountzos Theodoros University of Pireaus

201. Skouras Athanassios Athens University of Economics and Business

202. Skouras Dimitris University of Patras

203. Skouras Spyros Athens University of Economics and Business

204. Soderquist Klas Athens University of Economics and Business

205. Sorros Ιoannis University of Pireaus

206. Sotiropoulos Dimitris Athens University

207. Spinellis Diomidis Athens University of Economics and Business

208. Spyrou Spyros Athens University of Economics and Business

209. Stamatopoulos George University of Crete

210. Stathakopoulos Vlasios Athens University of Economics and Business

211. Stavrakoudis Athanassios University of Ioannina

212. Symeonidis Spyros University of Ioannina

213. Tarantilis Christos Athens University of Economics and Business

214. Tatsos Nikos Panteion University

215. Thalassinos Lefteris University of Pireaus

216. Thomadakis Stavros Athens University

217. Thomakos Dimitrios University of Peloponnese

218. Tinios Plato University of Pireaus

219. Topaloglou Nicholas Athens University of Economics and Business

220. Toumpis Stauros Athens University of Economics and Business

221. Tragaki Alexandra Harokopio University

222. Tsakanikas Angelos Metsovio Polytechnic University

223. Tsakiris Nikos University of Ioannina

224. Tsakloglou Panos Athens University of Economics and Business

225. Tsamourgelis Ioannis Aegean University

226. Tsintzos Panagiotis Democritus University of Thrace

227. Tsionas Efthymios Athens University of Economics and Business

228. Tsipouri Lena Athens University

229. Tsiritakis Emmanuel University of Pireaus

230. Tsoukalis Loukas Athens University

231. Tzavalis Elias Athens University of Economics and Business

232. Tzelepis Dimitrios University of Patras

233. Tzionas Ioannis University of Macedonia

234. Tzouvelekas Vangelis University of Crete

235. Vakola Maria Athens University of Economics and Business

236. Varsakelis Νikos Aristotle University of Thessaloniki

237. Vassilatos Vaggelis Athens University of Economics and Business

238. Veletzas Κostas University of Macedonia

239. Venetis Ioannis University of Patras

240. Vettas Νikolaos Athens University of Economics and Business

241. Voudouri Irini Athens University of Economics and Business

242. Xanthakis Manolis Athens University

243. Xepapadeas Tasos Athens University of Economics and Business

244. Zacharias Lefteris Athens University of Economics and Business

245. Zopounidis Konstantinos Polytechnic of Crete

246. Zoumboulakis Michalis University of Thessaly

References:

http://www.ekathimerini.com/198826/article/ekathimerini/news/declaration-of-professors-of-economics-at-greek-universities-on-the-referendum

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New Zealand weapons ban dream move of leftist activists

The American left is sure to pick this up and start screaming for an “assault weapons ban” because this supports their agenda so well.

Seraphim Hanisch

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Reuters reported on Thursday, March 21 that the Prime Minister of New Zealand enacted a sweeping change, banning weapons of the type that were used in the massacre of at least fifty Muslims, who were gunned down on livestream while in Friday prayer services in Christchurch last week. We quote from the Reuters piece below, with added emphasis:

New Zealand will ban military-style semi-automatic and assault rifles under tough new gun laws following the killing of 50 people in its worst mass shooting, Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern said on Thursday.

In the immediate aftermath of last Friday’s shootings at two mosques in the city of Christchurch, Ardern labeled the attack as terrorism and said New Zealand’s gun laws would change.

“On 15 March our history changed forever. Now, our laws will too. We are announcing action today on behalf of all New Zealanders to strengthen our gun laws and make our country a safer place,” Ardern told a news conference.

“All semi-automatic weapons used during the terrorist attack on Friday 15 March will be banned.”

Ardern said she expected the new laws to be in place by April 11 and a buy-back scheme costing up to NZ$200 million ($138 million) would be established for banned weapons.

All military style semi-automatics (MSSA) and assault rifles would be banned, along with parts used to convert weapons into MSSAs and all high-capacity magazines.

Australia banned semi-automatic weapons and launched a gun buy-back after the Port Arthur massacre in 1996 in which 35 people were killed.

Ardern said that similar to Australia, the law would allow for strictly enforced exemptions for farmers for pest control and animal welfare.

“I strongly believe that the vast majority of legitimate gun owners in New Zealand will understand that these moves are in the national interest, and will take these changes in their stride.”

This is undoubtedly going to be real red meat (or perhaps real vegetables) for the anti-gun lobby in the United States. This is because New Zealand strongly resembled the US in terms of firearm rights and the penetration of numbers of guns in the populace of this remote island nation. Reuters continues, with statements that would probably surprise, even horrify some gun owners in the States, but which are doubtlessly useful for the application of pressure on such individuals:

New Zealand, a country of fewer than 5 million people, has an estimated 1.2-1.5 million firearms, about 13,500 of them MSSA-type weapons.

Most farmers own guns while hunting of deer, pigs and goats is popular. Gun clubs and shooting ranges dot the country.

That has created a powerful lobby that has thwarted previous attempts to tighten gun laws.

Federated Farmers, which represent thousands of farmers, said it supported the new laws.

“This will not be popular among some of our members but … we believe this is the only practicable solution,” a group spokesman, Miles Anderson, said in a statement.

The main opposition National Party, which draws strong support in rural areas, said it also supported the ban.

The changes exclude two general classes of firearms commonly used for hunting, pest control and stock management on farms.

“I have a military style weapon. But to be fair, I don’t really use it, I don’t really need it,” said Noel Womersley, who slaughters cpoliticalattle for small farmers around Christchurch.

“So I’m quite happy to hand mine over.”

To be absolutely fair, the attack on the mosques was an awful event, made the worse by the shooter’s deliberate attempts to politicize various aspects of what he was doing and what he “stood for” as an attack ostensibly against US President Donald Trump, some seven thousand miles away in the United States.

The immediate reaction of the people interviewed, some among them related or friends with the victims of the massacre, was to embrace the weapons reform laws:

Nada Tawfeek, who buried her father-in-law killed in the attacks, Hussein Moustafa, on Thursday, welcomed the ban.

“It’s a great reaction. I think other countries need to learn from her [Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern],” Tawfeek said.

Mohammed Faqih, a member of the Islamic clergy who flew in from California and attended the funerals for some victims on Thursday, said he was “extremely grateful” for the gun ban.

“I wish our leaders in the States would follow on her footsteps and do the same thing,” he said.

One can expect there to be quite the outcry among American liberals about gun control, especially if anything remotely resembling this event takes place or is thwarted in coming days in the US.

It may seem very cold and cruel to focus on the political angle of this story rather than the human tragedy that it is. However, in this situation we have seen signs that the most vile form of human tragedy has actually taken place – the murder of dozens of innocent people for a mere political point. Indeed this thought has been noted and vilified already, as Mr. R.X. Dentith, writing for the New Zealand website Spinoff here quoted:

American paleo-conservative Rush Limbaugh was one of the first to note: “There’s an ongoing theory that the shooter himself may, in fact, be a leftist who writes the manifesto and then goes out and performs the deed purposely to smear his political enemies, knowing he’s going to get shot in the process. You know you just can’t – you can’t immediately discount this. The left is this insane, they are this crazy. And then if that’s exactly what the guy is trying to do then he’s hit a home run, because right there on Fox News: ‘Shooter is an admitted white nationalist who hates immigrants.’”

…[P]eople like Limbaugh… can’t stomach the idea the terrorist action in Otautahi might be motivated by the kind of rhetoric Limbaugh helps disseminate – tend to think there is a culture war going on, and they are on the losing side.

This war has many names, and the enemy is easily identified: it is the battle against Cultural Marxism; the fight against Toxic Feminism; the resistance to Identity Politics; and the fear of the Great Replacement, the thesis at the heart of the terrorist’s own manifesto.

The Great Replacement thesis posits that the majority white European countries are being “invaded” by non-white, non-European peoples. Not just that, but due to declining birth rates in the West, this “invasion” constitutes a wholesale replacement of the white population over time.

Mr. Dentith tries further to knock down this notion of the Great Replacement. However, he misses a much more basic point.

Someone who goes and takes human lives and broadcasts them for any reason is not a mere political operative. The person who does this is a very sick, deranged human being indeed. Evil is certainly appropriately used here.

However, evil is often quite cunning, and despite the intellectual arguments about the reality or non-reality of any particular manifesto statement, in this case, the killer played the media with infernal intelligence, and they took the bait. It is possible that Prime Minister Ardern also took the bait, in this most awful of bad situations, and to give her credit, she took swift actions to try to “correct” what was wrong.

But the problem here was not the type of weapons used. The problem is the fact that they were used by a person who thought these fifty people’s lives were worth nothing more than a bit of policy change. One of the worst examples of human evil in recent times, this incident shouts to the world that there is a problem, but the problem remains unsolved, even though many people will hand over their firearms out of a genuine wish for compassion to those lost and the hope that somehow this action will prevent a future incident.

But the logic of this emotional reaction is nil. And what is worse is that the American Left knows this, but does not care. The movers and shakers of liberalism will likely milk the actions of sincerely horrified New Zealanders for all they are worth to try at affecting change in American constitutional rights.

And the innocent dead will not rest in peace, because the real problem has not even been examined.

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Upstart Populist Party Shocks In Dutch Election Upset, 2 Days After Utrecht Attack

International reports have described the FvD as receiving “a surge of last-minute support” in the days following the Utrecht attack.

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Via Zerohedge…


Dutch voters have sent shock waves through Europe at the polls on Wednesday in the wake of Monday’s deadly Utrecht terror shooting, in which a now detained 37-year old Turkish man went on a terrifying tram killing spree which left three dead and three injured.

Euroskeptic party, Forum for Democracy (FvD), has emerged victorious in key provincial elections this week, paving the way to making it one of the two largest groups in the Dutch Senate, and representing growing Dutch frustration with the recent unprecedented refugee influx in Europe.

Newcomer Forum for Democracy party is led by 36-year-old Thierry Baudet, who is a critic of the EU and of the Netherlands’ immigration policies, via EPA

International reports have described the FvD as receiving “a surge of last-minute support” in the days following the Utrecht attack, which investigators have since described as having a “terror motive” based on a letter found in shooter Gokmen Tanis’ possession.

Forum for Democracy party leader Thierry Baudet had immediately placed ultimate blame  for the incident on the government’s “lax immigration policies” and provocatively stated a day before the elections (referencing his political rival)

If people want more deadly shootings like the one in Utrecht, then they have to vote for the VVD.

Baudet, riding a wave of renewed Euroskeptic sentiment, and whose party also wants to see more military spending, green initiatives, and an easing on income tax while greatly restricting the borders, said in the aftermath of Wednesday’s vote: “The voters in the Netherlands have spread their wings and shown their true power.”

Referencing the Utrecht attack and other deadly terror incidents on European soil, he added: “We have been called to the front because we have to. Because the country needs us.”

Three were killed and several injured in Monday’s Dutch tram terror attack, which raised the country’s emergency threat level to five as it was unfolding, its highest level.

Interestingly, the 36-year old Baudet and his party continued campaigning down to the last moments even as others stopped in the wake of Monday’s attack which rocked the Netherlands. According to Al Jazeera:

Following the lead of US President Donald Trump, Baudet opposes immigration and emphasises “Dutch first” cultural and economic themes. He opposes the euro and thinks the Netherlands should leave the European Union.

Baudet had continued campaigning when other parties stopped after Monday’s attack in Utrecht, in which a gunman shot three people dead on a tram. The populist leader blamed the incident on the government’s lax immigration policies.

The FvD is now set to take 12 seats in the upper house of parliament, which is equal to Prime Minister Mark Rutte’s conservative VVD Party, a scenario before this week considered unlikely according to many observers.

The FvD slightly outscoring the VVD means Rutte’s government has lost its majority for the 75-seat Senate ahead of upcoming May elections.

In a post-election speech on Wednesday, Baudet described further that what’s now being described in international media as “an upstart populist party [that has] shocked the Dutch political establishment” as punishing the arrogance of elites.

In his pro-Western civilization themed remarks, Baudet added, “We are standing in the rubble of what was once the most beautiful civilization in the world.”

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Will The Trump White House finally punish Facebook for censorship?

The Duran Quick Take: Episode 113.

Alex Christoforou

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The Duran’s Alex Christoforou and Editor-in-Chief Alexander Mercouris take a look at US President Trump’s tweet where he has said that he would be “looking into” a report that his social media chief, Dan Scavino Jr. has been censored by Facebook.

Are we finally about to see the Trump White House move to punish social media outlets for their blatant and bias censorship of alternative narratives that dare to stray from globalist neo-liberal and radical left ideology?

Remember to Please Subscribe to The Duran’s YouTube Channel.

Follow The Duran Audio Podcast on Soundcloud.

“Conservatives face a tough fight as Big Tech’s censorship expands”, authored by Donald Trump Jr., via The Hill…

As Big Tech’s censorship of conservatives becomes ever more flagrant and overt, the old arguments about protecting the sanctity of the modern public square are now invalid. Our right to freely engage in public discourse through speech is under sustained attack, necessitating a vigorous defense against the major social media and internet platforms.

From “shadowbans” on Facebook and Twitter, to demonetization of YouTube videos, to pulled ads for Republican candidates at the critical junctures of election campaigns, the list of violations against the online practices and speech of conservatives is long.

I certainly had my suspicions confirmed when Instagram, which is owned by Facebook, “accidentally” censored a post I made regarding the Jussie Smollett hoax, which consequently led to me hearing from hundreds of my followers about how they’ve been having problems seeing, liking or being able to interact with my posts. Many of them even claimed that they’ve had to repeatedly refollow me, as Instagram keeps unfollowing me on their accounts.

While nothing about Big Tech’s censorship of conservatives truly surprises me anymore, it’s still chilling to see the proof for yourself. If it can happen to me, the son of the president, with millions of followers on social media, just think about how bad it must be for conservatives with smaller followings and those who don’t have the soapbox or media reach to push back when they’re being targeted?

Thanks to a brave Facebook whistleblower who approached James O’Keefe’s Project Veritas, we now know that Mark Zuckerberg’s social media giant developed algorithms to “deboost” certain content, limiting its distribution and appearance in news feeds. As you probably guessed, this stealth censorship was specifically aimed at conservatives.

Facebook appears to have deliberately tailored its algorithm to recognize the syntax and style popular among conservatives in order to “deboost” that content. “Mainstream media,” “SJW” (Social Justice Warrior) and “red pill” — all terms that conservatives often use to express themselves — were listed as red flags, according to the former Facebook insider.

Facebook engineers even cited BlazeTV host Lauren Chen’s video criticizing the social justice movement as an example of the kind of “red pills” that users just aren’t allowed to drop anymore. Mainstream conservative content was strangled in real time, yet fringe leftists such as the Young Turks enjoy free rein on the social media platform.

Despite the occasional brave gesture, politicians have been far too sluggish in recognizing the extent of the problem. But the Republican Party and the conservative movement are becoming more vigilant against the suppression of our speech, as we saw at last weekend’s Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC).

Silicon Valley lobbyists have splashed millions of dollars all over the Washington swamp to play on conservatives’ innate faith in the free-market system and respect for private property. Even as Big Tech companies work to exclude us from the town square of the 21st century, they’ve been able to rely on misguided conservatives to carry water for them with irrelevant pedantry about whether the First Amendment applies in cases of social media censorship.

Sen. Josh Hawley (R-Mo.) has been making a name for himself as a Republican prepared to stand up to Big Tech malfeasance since his time as Missouri’s attorney general. He delivered a tour de force interview with The Wall Street Journal’s Kimberly Strassel in front of the CPAC crowd, one that provided a clear-eyed assessment of the ongoing affront to the freedoms of conservative speech and expression.

Hawley demolished the absurd notion that “conservative principles” preclude taking action to ensure free debate online simply because Big Tech firms — the most powerful corporations in the world — are private companies.

Hawley pointed out that Big Tech companies already enjoy “sweetheart deals” under current regulations that make their malfeasance a matter of public concern. Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, for instance, allows them to avoid liability for the content that users post to their platforms. To address this problem, Hawley proposed adding a viewpoint neutrality requirement for platforms that benefit from Section 230’s protections, which were originally enacted to protect the internet as “a forum for a true diversity of political discourse.”

“Google and Facebook should not be a law unto themselves,” Hawley declared. “They should not be able to discriminate against conservatives. They should not be able to tell us we need to sit down and shut up!”

It’s high time other conservative politicians started heeding Hawley’s warnings, because the logical endpoint of Big Tech’s free rein is far more troubling than conservative meme warriors losing their Twitter accounts. As we’re already starting to see, what starts with social media censorship can quickly lead to banishment from such fundamental services as transportation, online payments and banking.

Left unchecked, Big Tech and liberal activists could construct a private “social credit” system — not unlike what the communists have nightmarishly implemented in China — that excludes outspoken conservatives from wide swaths of American life simply because their political views differ from those of tech executives.

There is no conservative principle that even remotely suggests we are obligated to adopt a laissez-faire attitude while the richest companies on earth abuse the power we give them to put a thumb on the scale for our political enemies.

If anything, our love of the free market dictates that we must do whatever is necessary to ensure that the free marketplace of ideas remains open to all.

Donald Trump Jr. is executive vice president at The Trump Organization.

 

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