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14-page report completely debunks White House claim on Syria’s chemical attack

The Trump Administration's claim that President Assad launched a chemical attack against his own people, is quickly losing credibility.

On Tuesday, the White House released a declassified intelligence report accusing Syrian President Bashar al-Assad of ordering and organizing an attack, in which Syrian planes allegedly dropped chemical munitions on civilians in the rebel-held town.

MIT Professor Theodore Postol has put together a detailed 14-page assessment about Syria’s alleged use of chemical weapons in the Idlib province on April 4th. Postol says a chemical attack with a nerve agent did occur, but the available evidence does not support the US government’s conclusions. In the below document, Professor Postol says that the White House’s claim “contains absolutely no evidence that this attack was the result of a munition being dropped from an aircraft.”

READ MORE: 3 reasons why reports of a Syrian chemical weapons attack on Idlib are fake news

Postol was not convinced by the evidence provided by the White House:

“In fact, a main piece of evidence that is cited in the document points to an attack that was executed by individuals on the ground, not from an aircraft, on the morning of April 4. This conclusion is based on an assumption made by the White House when it cited the source of the sarin release and the photographs of that source. My own assessment, is that the source was very likely tampered with or staged, so no serious conclusion could be made from the photographs cited by the White House. However, if one assumes, as does the White House, that the source of the sarin was from this location and that the location was not tampered with, the most plausible conclusion is that the sarin was dispensed by an improvised dispersal device made from a 122 mm section of rocket tube filled with sarin and capped on both sides.”

Postol concludes that although a chemical attack did take place in Khan Shaykhun, Syria – the Syrian Air Force was not involved in the attack, but was launched from the ground:

“I have reviewed the document carefully, and I believe it can be shown, without doubt, that the document does not provide any evidence whatsoever that the US government has concrete knowledge that the government of Syria was the source of the chemical attack in Khan Shaykhun, Syria at roughly 6 to 7 a.m. on April 4, 2017.”

Below is Professor Postol’s full 14-page assessment that he submitted to RT America — a document that may keep us out of a full-scale war:

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Vladimir Rodzianko
Managing Director and Writer atThe Duran.

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