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Vladimir Putin played a key role in the OPEC production cut deal

By taking on the role of an intermediary between Saudi Arabia and Iran, Vladimir Putin was able to get OPEC to cut oil production for the first time since 2008.

As details surrounding OPEC’s groundbreaking decision to cut production by 1.2 million barrels a day emerge, it is becoming increasingly clear that the deal would not have been possible without the active intermediary role of the Russian President Vladimir Putin.

Not only was Putin able to help settle the differences between two major OPEC rivals – Saudi Arabia and Iran, but, he also got Russia – a non OPEC member state – involved in a OPEC deal for the first time in 15 years.

Reuters reports:

Russian President Vladimir Putin played a crucial role in helping OPEC rivals Iran and Saudi Arabia set aside differences to forge the cartel’s first deal with non-OPEC Russia in 15 years.

Interventions ahead of Wednesday’s OPEC meeting came at key moments from Putin, Saudi Deputy Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman and Iran’s Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei and President Hassan Rouhani, OPEC and non-OPEC sources said.

Putin’s role as intermediary between Riyadh and Tehran was pivotal, testament to the rising influence of Russia in the Middle East since its military intervention in the Syrian civil war just over a year ago.

It started when Putin met Saudi Prince Mohammed in September on the sidelines of a G20 gathering in China. The two agreed to cooperate to help world oil markets clear a glut that had more than halved oil prices since 2014.

In September, OPEC agreed in principle at a meeting in Algiers to reduce output for the first time since the 2008 financial crisis. But the individual country commitments required to finalize a deal at Wednesday’s Vienna meeting still required much diplomacy.

Recent OPEC meetings have failed because of arguments between de facto leader Saudi Arabia and third-largest producer Iran. Tehran has long argued OPEC should not prevent it restoring output lost during years of Western sanctions.

Proxy wars in Syria and Yemen have exacerbated decades of tensions between the Saudi Sunni kingdom and the Iranian Shi’ite Islamic republic.

Putin established that the Saudis would shoulder the lion’s share of cuts, as long as Riyadh wasn’t seen to be making too large a concession to Iran. A deal was possible if Iran didn’t celebrate victory over the Saudis.

A phone call between Putin and Iranian President Rouhani smoothed the way. After the call, Rouhani and oil minister Bijan Zanganeh went to their supreme leader for approval, a source close to the Ayatollah said.

On Wednesday, the Saudis agreed to cut production heavily, taking “a big hit” in the words of energy minister Khalid al-Falih – while Iran was allowed to slightly boost output.

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Sergey Gladysh
Managing Editor for The Duran.
Co-founder and president of the Russian-American Youth Association.
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