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Rodman or Trump? Who secured the release of American serving 15-year prison sentence in North Korea

Who got the American student out of North Korea?

Remember the American student, Otto Warmbier, 21, who was found guilty of what the North Korean government called “subversion.”

This was Warmbier’s weeping video during a North Korean sentencing…

Moments ago North Korea released Otto Warmbier, who was serving a 15-year prison term with hard labor for alleged anti-state acts.

US Secretary of State Rex Tillerson made the announcement on Tuesday, that came as former NBA player Dennis Rodman was visiting Pyongyang.

Tillerson’s statement…

“At the direction of the President, the Department of State has secured the release of Otto Warmbier from North Korea.”

“Mr. Warmbier is en route to the U.S. where he will be reunited with his family.”

Rex Tillerson’s statement offered no other details and made no mention of Dennis Rodman’s visit.

The US State Department is continuing “to have discussions” with North Korea about the release of other American citizens who are jailed in the isolated nation.

Dennis Rodman said he did not plan to raise the fate of the Americans while he was in North Korea, but as Zerohedge reports“if he [Rodman] manages to persuade Kim to end his nuclear program – something no other US politicians has achieved – it will mark quite a dramatic departure in style and substance to US foreign policy.”  Incidentally, Rodman’s trip to North Korea is being sponsored by a digital currency for weed.

Citing privacy concerns. the statement said the US State Department would have no further comment on Warmbier.

AP News reports

In March 2016, North Korea’s highest court sentenced Warmbier to 15 years in prison with hard labor for subversion as he tearfully confessed that he had tried to steal a propaganda banner.

Warmbier, 22, a University of Virginia undergraduate, was convicted and sentenced in a one-hour trial in North Korea’s Supreme Court.

The U.S. government condemned the sentence and accused North Korea of using such American detainees as political pawns.

The court held that Warmbier had committed a crime “pursuant to the U.S. government’s hostile policy toward (the North), in a bid to impair the unity of its people after entering it as a tourist.”

North Korea regularly accuses Washington and Seoul of sending spies to overthrow its government to enable the U.S.-backed South Korean government to take control of the Korean Peninsula.

Before his trial, Warmbier had said he tried to steal a propaganda banner as a trophy for an acquaintance who wanted to hang it in her church. That would be grounds in North Korea for a subversion charge. He identified the church as Friendship United Methodist Church. Meshach Kanyion, pastor of the church in Wyoming, declined to comment Wednesday.

North Korea announced Warmbier’s arrest in late January 2016, saying he committed an anti-state crime with “the tacit connivance of the U.S. government and under its manipulation.” Warmbier had been staying at the Yanggakdo International Hotel. It is common for sections of tourist hotels to be reserved for North Korean staff and off-limits to foreigners.

In a tearful statement made before his trial, Warmbier told a gathering of reporters in Pyongyang he was offered a used car worth $10,000 if he could get a propaganda banner and was also told that if he was detained and didn’t return, $200,000 would be paid to his mother in the form of a charitable donation.

Warmbier said he accepted the offer because his family was “suffering from very severe financial difficulties.”

Warmbier also said he had been encouraged by the university’s “Z Society,” which he said he was trying to join. The magazine of the university’s alumni association describes the Z Society as a “semi-secret ring society” founded in 1892 that conducts philanthropy, puts on honorary dinners and grants academic awards.

 
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Alex Christoforou
Writer and director forThe Duran - Living the dream in Moscow.

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