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Emmanuel Macron’s victory is a colour revolution in disguise

French politics have been forever changed by this election.

Macron has won the presidential elections, but the making of this unusual campaign raises many questions. First of all, this is not a landslide victory for the candidate of the EU. Marine Le Pen received 11 millions voters, one third of the French didn’t vote or spoiled their ballot. Furthermore, half of Macron’s voters voted not for him but against the ‘threat’ represented by Le Pen.

How did we get here?

Let’s rewind the last couple of years. Hollande was lucid enough to know that he didn’t stand a chance of being re-elected. The socialist party was already starting to implode between its right wing lea by Manuel Valls and the left wing of Benoit Hamon. Emmanuel Macron, a close adviser and then minister of economy became the obvious choice for the sinking president. First task, destroy the socialist party and rig the primary. A lot of irregularities were found in the process. The fact that ‘Hamon the nobody’ won over Valls opened things up for the ascension of Mélenchon.

The second task of the elite was  to destroy Francois Fillon.

The third task was to ensure the presence of Marine Le Pen in the second round of presidential elections, easy. Keep on showing complacency toward Islamism, and clamp down the judges. In this sense, the 2017 presidential election became a one round election, facing Marine Le Pen at the second round was just a formality for the establishment candidate. Nevertheless, it didn’t stop the establishment from crying wolf about the danger of ‘Nazism’.

Other questions are still open. If Hamon and Mélenchon had joined forces, they might have been in the second round. Also, Juppé could have replaced Fillon after he was summoned by a judge, but he declined. The road therefore was cleared for Macron.

The huge main stream media war machine could start its campaign. Never in French history was a candidate so fully backed by the establishment, and an another one so brutally destroyed. The parliamentary elections are now the key of the future . The new president needs a majority and the question is, where will he find it? He said that his movement, En Marche, will put its candidates in every towns and cities. Are they going to be new comers, or defected MP’s of the left…or the right ?

Les Républicains, except for a few black sheep like Bruno Lemaire, the archetype of the boneless power thirsty candidate, kept a consistent line, they are in the opposition, and will fight to get the majority.

Mélenchon, has taken an angry posture, he thinks that he has been robbed of his seat at the second round.
Le Front National just entered a heavy zone of turbulence, and has a huge task to re-build the party which is now in a state of clinical death. Marion Maréchal Le Pen, the new young and bright star of the party just announced that she will leave, the old Jean-Marie Le Pen is screaming at those who want to rename the party, and the leadership of Marine Le Pen has been questioned after her defeat. Their hope of getting 15 MPs to be able to create a parliamentary group is not yet unrealistic,but the french political system disadvantages them a lot.

The last, but not least, is the socialist party. Most of the leaders said publicly that they will run under the banner of their party, but Manuels Valls, the former prime minister of Hollande, another avid, ambitious politician just announced that he will run under Macron’s party.
The decomposition of the French political landscape is not over yet.

The establishment easily won the presidential election, but the second step doesn’t sound as easy. They have a president to ‘rule’, but will they have a government to ‘govern’ ?

There no doubts that heavy underground movements have already started and that the media war machine is already in their starting-gates. Will it be a colour revolution or a light pastel? Only time till tell.

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Jean-Michel Cosnuau
French political analyst and writer atThe Duran