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Donald Trump’s transformation of the Republican Party

The Republican party had been stuck in the neo-con shadow of Geroge W. Bush for the last seventeen years. Donald Trump has changed this a great deal.

There are already signs that Donald Trump is transforming the Republican Party from a neo-con body into one more at ease with traditional conservatism.

One of the clearest barometers of such trends is Fox News, the perennial mouth piece of the Republican Party, and one time hawkish neo-con bullhorn.

But things seem to be slowly changing.

Megyn Kelly, the dime-store air head who disguised her vendetta against Donald Trump as a kind of feminist crusade, is out. Turkey Carlson, who has been excellent on exposing the mainstream media lies about ‘Russian hacking’, is more in than ever, and long-time Fox news host, Sean Hannity has confessed to Julian Assange that his earlier castigatory remarks about Wikileaks were unfair given the enormity of the service which Wikileaks has provided.

Hannity, a stalwart Trump supporter, seems to have eschewed his previous support for Bush style military foreign policies in favour of Trump’s more restrained, pragmatic, anti-interventionist approach.

All I can say is: well done Sean Hannity. He may be late to the party, but for my part he should be a welcome guest.

What all this indicates is that the Republican groundswell is moving away from childish lightweights like Paul Ryan, as well as from the John McCain-Lindsey Graham lunatic fringe.

Trump still has plenty of enemies in the Republican establishment, but he seems to be doing a quietly astute job of changing the symbol of the Republican Party from something of a Persian War Elephant, to a wiser, more restrained beast.

There will yet be many internal struggles ahead for Trump with members of his own party, but as talk radio did in the 1990s, Trump’s social media revolution may well help purge that party of its Congressional members who are out of touch with the revitalised party base.

For all the discussions of Republican voters being divided by Trump, in reality his movement has galvanised new and lapsed Republican voters whose reason for coming to, and in some cases returning to, the Republican party was based entirely on the attraction of this one individual.

The more Trump is underestimated, the stronger he becomes.

 

 

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Adam Garrie
Managing Editor atThe Duran

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