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“Boy in Aleppo” photographer is exposed as an ISIS sympathizer

We should be cautiously critical of the motives of those who glorify brutality one day, while snapping pictures of its victims the next.

The photojournalist behind the boy in Aleppo is Mahmoud Raslan.

By now we have all seen the image that has gone viral and is sure to be used as a launch pad for a Hillary humanitarian war in Syria.

Liberals and progressives heap praise for Raslan’s work in the field of combat, and his “evidence” of Assad’s brutality and Russia’s “aggression.”

The calls are already sounding from the halls of Washington, and over the mass media airwaves, to provide more support to the “moderate rebels” in Syria.

And this is exactly what the image was meant to do.

Renforce the narrative that the so called “moderates” fighting the Assad regime need support from the US in order to prevent more images like this one ever appearing again.

Unless, of course you consider that the “moderates” also go by the name “Al Qaeda” or “Al Nusra”. Some are even called ISIS…and Raslan, well he appears to have some pretty strong ties to the “moderates” that Washington is so eager to arm.

The Canary reveals the truth about the man behind the “boy in Aleppo”…

Raslan’s social media history reveals a bizarre twist, which demonstrates the ironies and complexities of the Syrian conflict. The photographer has posted photos of himself posing with known child-killers from another recent viral moment: the infamous filmed beheading of a 12-year-old Palestinian boy captured in Aleppo by the ‘Zenki’ militant group.

The Palestinian boy, filmed surrounded by his Zenki executioners in the back of a pick-up truck just prior to his beheading, had been reportedly removed from a hospital and had intravenous lines (IV) attached to him.

On 5 August, about two weeks after the public beheading committed by unmasked men whose identities were made clear by the camera, Mahmoud Raslan uploaded a selfie with two men who had apparently been among those carrying out the shocking execution on his Facebook page:


Raslan is grinning in the bottom left corner and behind him stand two men who appear to have been featured prominently in the prior child-beheading video [screenshot]:


At least one of the two child-beheading men has an identify that’s been clearly established. The man directly behind Raslan in the selfie on the left is Umar Salkho. He is often described in Arabic media as a leader of the Zenki Movement, the group responsible for carrying out the atrocity – the video footage of which was uploaded to the internet on 19 July 2016. Ironically, the US-backed Zenki group claimed it had quickly arrested the individual perpetrators and said they would face swift justice. But Salkho can be seen again in a video uploaded on 28 July 2016 here.

Raslan wrote the following caption for his 5 August Facebook selfie in Arabic as follows [translated by The Canary]:

“When you see the leaders on the front, know that victory is coming, with God’s permission. From besieged Aleppo, wherein they all have their faces blackened.”

It is deeply disturbing that the photographer now being lauded globally for the ‘the boy in the ambulance’ photo only a short time ago posed with and praised men who were well-known for having publicly beheaded a wounded child. Incidentally, Raslan is also wearing the same shirt on both occasions (see him go in and out of the footage which captured the moments the little boy was placed in the ambulance).

And there is more (courtesy of The Canary)…

Raslan, who identifies himself on Twitter as “a Syrian media activist” [translation], has also made multiple statements publicly praising suicide bombers.

The below screenshot from Raslan’s Facebook page reads as follows [translated by The Canary]:

“With the suicide fighters, from the land of battles and butchery, from Aleppo of the martyrs, we bring you tidings of impending joy, with God’s permission.”


Another post reads:

“Thousands of suicide fighters and tens of booby-traps are being prepared for the great battle in Aleppo, the first battle where I see men weeping because they can’t participate on account of the number of attackers.”


Many more videos and images exist on Raslan’s social media accounts which praise inghimasiyin (an Arabic transliteration which in the Syrian war is a reference to “suicide-fighters“).

It is a sad testament to the complexities and ironies of the seemingly endless war in Syria that even some of its most celebrated photographers would associate with child-killers while at the same time attempting to illuminate the tragic plight of children in the country.

Syria has produced the ugliest of all propaganda wars, in which all sides now compete to place before the world the most iconic and moving images of suffering. This fact should make us wary and cautiously critical, not of the innocent children featured in such images, but of the motives of those who glorify brutality one day while snapping pictures of its victims the next.

A picture is worth a thousand words…and this staged event (and those who jumped on the bandwagon to call for more war) speaks volumes.

boy in aleppo


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Alex Christoforou
Writer and director forThe Duran - Living the dream in Moscow.

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